Josh Clark

Josh Clark

HowStuffWorks

Josh Clark wanted to be a professional writer since his third-grade teacher told him a short story he wrote was kind of good. He's written ever since. He's a former senior writer for HowStuffWorks and current co-host of the Stuff You Should Know podcast. Josh lives with his wife, Umi. The pair really, really enjoys traveling, solving mysteries, having pizza parties and visiting museums (both renowned and obscure). Josh has been to the real-life house that served as the Robin's Nest on "Magnum, P.I." and is on an indefinite hiatus from being a jerk.

Recent Contributions

This American institution began with Abraham Lincoln following Stephen Douglas on the campaign trail. Today, the presidential debate is one of the most anticipated markers of candidates' campaigns.

By Josh Clark & Melanie Radzicki McManus

When Gov. John White left Roanoke to gather supplies from England, he was astonished at what he found when he returned. The colonists were gone, their houses were gone and the only clue to their whereabouts was a tree carved with the word "CROATOAN."

By Josh Clark & Nathan Chandler

Political primaries let voters choose which candidate they want to represent their political party as president. But not everyone is happy with the process. What are the problems, and can they be fixed?

By Josh Clark & Kathryn Whitbourne

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What makes the American Revolution stand out in world history? Was it the introduction of guerrilla warfare or its stage outside the borders of its parent nation? All those were noteworthy, but the real revolution was what the Revolution created.

By Josh Clark & Dave Roos

While Londoners on the East End saw their fair share of grime, drugs and prostitution, nothing could've prepared them for Jack the Ripper's bloody rampage in 1888. What's the story behind this legendary killer?

By Josh Clark & Patrick J. Kiger

A bad LSD trip can drive a person to suicide. So why would the CIA use American citizens as guinea pigs for its drug research?

By Josh Clark

After nearly half a century capturing the attention and imaginations of millions, the infamous D.B. Cooper plane-hijacking case has been closed. Will we ever know the true culprit?

By Josh Clark

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Formerly known as "shell shock," research into post-traumatic stress disorder began intensely after Congress requested a study of how Vietnam veterans were readjusting to civilian life in 1983. What have we learned since then about PTSD?

By Josh Clark

While kissing can provide a host of health benefits, there can be some dangers lurking in these intimate moments.

By Josh Clark & Brion O'Connor

Do solar powered cars cause pollution? Keep reading to learn about solar powered cars and if they cause pollution.

By Josh Clark

Did you know that there are differences in what the words "danger," "caution," "poison" and "warning" mean when they're printed on a consumer product? It's not up to the manufacturer to choose which word best goes with the design on the product label.

By Josh Clark

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Anyone who's seen the famous, grainy footage of the Hindenburg disaster is familiar with the idea that hydrogen ignites easily. Burning unlocks stored energy, making hydrogen useful as a fuel.

By Josh Clark

The search for the lost city of Atlantis has obsessed scientists and historians for centuries, thanks to Plato's written account of its destruction. But is it real? If so, where is it?

By Josh Clark

Maybe you've heard whispers of dragons, Dungeon Masters and 20-sided dice, but how much do you really know about the world's most famous role-playing game? Get in character, because we're going on a quest to learn the ABCs of D&D.

By Tracy V. Wilson, Josh Clark & Kate Kershner

You'd think that earthworms are good for fish bait and little else, but that isn't the case at all. Earthworms are the engines that help local ecosystems run. They aerate soil, help facilitate plant composition and so much more.

By Josh Clark

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Thoroughbred horses aren't just pretty; they're the end result of centuries of breeding and record-keeping. Where did Thoroughbreds come from -- and why are so many so determined to keep them pure?

By Josh Clark

People donate their bodies to science all the time, usually after death. Here, we highlight 10 scientists who experimented on themselves while they were still alive. Not always such a good idea, eh Dr. Jekyll?

By Josh Clark

How did life on Earth begin? Theories abound, but one popular one posits that it started spontaneously from primordial ooze on our planet, while another holds that it literally came from outer space. Who's right?

By Josh Clark

Visitors to remote jungles face several potential dangers. Disease, ferocious animals, deadly plant life, the risk of having your head shrunken … wait, what?

By Josh Clark

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You use the number zero all the time, but it may surprise you to learn that it sometimes isn't a number at all. It may surprise you even more to learn that it was all but invented. See what else surprises you about zero in this article.

By Josh Clark