Laurie L. Dove is an award-winning journalist who covers timely topics for HowStuffWorks. She is the author of six books and the former owner of a newspaper and magazine. When not reporting on the latest tech breakthrough, health advance or economic development, Dove is tracking down hidden history, science innovations and biologic discoveries. As the Honorable Laurie Dove, Mayor, she has brought multi-million-dollar improvements to the small Midwest town where she lives with her husband, five children and two Akitas.

Recent Contributions

Finches can live for five to 10 years and make great companion pets as long as they are given enough space to fly around.

By Laurie L. Dove

Nuts are born, dry roasted and salted, in a can on the grocery store shelf, right? Not exactly. You might be surprised at what they look like before humans get ahold of them.

By Laurie L. Dove

The rare Bombay cat is all black, but color alone doesn't make a cat a Bombay.

By Laurie L. Dove

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Dr. Seuss didn't live atop Mount Crumpit. He didn't have a loyal pup named Max outfitted with reindeer antlers. But there were some similarities between Seuss and his famous green miser.

By Laurie L. Dove

The human voice, including both pitch and volume, is created here as air travels through the vocal cords, but it can change based on the position of the tongue, lips, mouth and pharynx.

By Laurie L. Dove

The lazy Susan is a circular tray that spins to make food service easier, but the origins of the name are a bit murky.

By Laurie L. Dove

The blue-footed booby is known as much for its comical mating dance as for its intensely colored blue feet.

By Laurie L. Dove

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Macaws mate for life, can speak human words and have even been known to blush when delighted.

By Laurie L. Dove

In 'A Series of Unfortunate Events,' noted for its dark humor and sarcastic storytelling, narrator Lemony Snicket recounts the calamitous lives of the Baudelaire children, who are orphaned after a mysterious house fire.

By Laurie L. Dove

Everybody knows that carrots are good for you, but what happens if you eat too many of them?

By Laurie L. Dove

From the worlds of politics, professional baseball and old-time boxing came a term still in use today to describe someone who has a left-handed predilection.

By Laurie L. Dove

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As summer heats up and starts to sizzle, what could be more fun and refreshing than an inflatable backyard pool of cool? Here's what you need to know before you buy one.

By Laurie L. Dove

There's something romantic about running off with your beloved and getting married. On the other hand, you might incur the wrath of family and friends for leaving them out of this joyous event. When is elopement right and when is it wrong?

By Laurie L. Dove

Work by volunteers and nonprofit organizations, such as butterfly waystations and increased education efforts, has turned around long-term population decline for some butterfly species.

By Laurie L. Dove

March 15, the Ides of March, has become synonymous with betrayal, lost loyalty and unwelcome surprises. But should this day still make us wary?

By Laurie L. Dove

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Airlines are flying planes with no passengers, due in part to the worldwide outbreak of coronavirus, but also for economic reasons that have nothing to do with disease.

By Laurie L. Dove

Kefir is a fermented milk drink similar to a thin yogurt, said to be full of good gut bacteria and capable of lowering blood sugar and bad cholesterol. Sounds great, but does the hype match the reality?

By Laurie L. Dove

When temperatures drop below freezing, homeowners are advised to leave one tap dripping overnight. But does this advice hold up, or is it kind of leaky?

By Laurie L. Dove

You should never, ever flush tissues. What else?

By Laurie L. Dove

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The way to a dog's heart is definitely through a belly rub, but just touching a cat's belly will probably get you a back-leg rabbit kick and a painful vise of teeth and claws.

By Laurie L. Dove