Tracy  Wilson

Tracy Wilson

HowStuffWorks

Tracy V. Wilson has loved stories and science for as long as she can remember. She joined HowStuffWorks as a staff writer in 2005, and she spent her first few years at the site destroying gadgets and mining patents, papers and interviews for the sake of figuring out what makes things tick. In 2007, she took on the role of hiring and training HowStuffWorks' new writers and editors, and she became site director in 2010. She co-hosted the PopStuff pop culture podcast with Holly Frey. No longer actively involved with the site, the pair now co-hosts Stuff You Missed in History Class. Tracy spends her downtime much like she spends her time at work: reading, writing, tinkering and brooking only the most delightful nonsense.

Recent Contributions

Billions of dollars' worth of CDs and digital downloads are sold each year and the Grammy Awards recognize the people who create all this music. How are winners picked and who have been some of the most controversial?

By Tracy V. Wilson & Alia Hoyt

Gargoyles have a long and fascinating architectural history. But whatever ... they're freakin' creepy.

By Tracy V. Wilson

On May 6, 1937, the Hindenburg, the largest airship ever built, crashed and burned in Lakehurst, N.J. Thirty-six people were killed, including one person on the ground.

By Tracy V. Wilson

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Hurricane Sandy struck the East Coast of the United States on Oct. 29, 2012, causing extensive flooding and damage. Millions of homes, businesses and even hospitals lost power in the wake of the storm.

By Tracy V. Wilson & Allison Loudermilk

Seven out of 10 biologists surveyed believe the Earth is undergoing a mass extinction. This is just one of the Top 10 biggest warning signs that we're in the middle of a widespread, human-caused mass extinction.

By Tracy V. Wilson

Maybe you've heard whispers of dragons, Dungeon Masters and 20-sided dice, but how much do you really know about the world's most famous role-playing game? Get in character, because we're going on a quest to learn the ABCs of D&D.

By Tracy V. Wilson, Josh Clark & Kate Kershner

They're at every sci-fi convention and Halloween party -- those people who always have the most amazing, original costumes. Learn the basics of building a costume and find out what it takes to do well in costume competitions.

By Tracy V. Wilson & Sharita Sykes

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Drills have a big job to do in a small amount of space. Find out how this handy tool gets its powerful punch in this image gallery.

By Tracy V. Wilson

As it does every year, Dragon*Con's annual parade drew huge crowds and amazing costumes in 2011. Take a look at everything from Jedi to pirate wenches.

By Tracy V. Wilson

A common misconception is that magma comes from the Earth's molten core. It really comes from the mantle, the layer between the core and the crust. Will it ever run out?

By Tracy V. Wilson

The ozone layer prevents much of the sun's ultraviolet light from reaching the Earth. But there's a problem: a gaping hole the size of Antarctica. What can we do about it?

By Tracy V. Wilson & Julia Layton

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In a way, your spine is the keystone that holds your body together. Since it has so many important jobs, it has to develop in exactly the right way. How does this happen?

By Tracy V. Wilson

On May 19, 2009, researchers unveiled a fossil called Ida. Within hours, headlines were abuzz with news of the missing link. But a day later, many scientists weren't so sure.

By Tracy V. Wilson

When some people hear the word "dinosaur," they immediately think of outdated technology. Does that mean that the dinosaurs themselves were failures?

By Tracy V. Wilson

Many scientists believe that the impact from a massive asteroid was what killed off the dinosaurs. It's what started the Age of Mammals. But what if the asteroid had missed?

By Tracy V. Wilson

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Sometimes dinosaur fossils are too large and heavy to display without damaging them. How are those enormous models built? And what makes them look so realistic?

By Tracy V. Wilson

Ever since its discovery in 2000, a dinosaur fossil named Leonardo has held the interest of paleontologists the world over. A 3-D model of the animal even toured the world. So what's the big deal?

By Tracy V. Wilson

Scientists believe that water pressure kept many dinosaurs from swimming. But does that mean that none of these massive animals took a prehistoric skinny-dip?

By Tracy V. Wilson

Some people believe that dinosaurs were relatives of today's birds. But, you might ask, if that's so, why didn't they have feathers? Funny you should ask.

By Tracy V. Wilson

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It's not a trick; before you are a number of reptilian footprints in the rock. They're dinosaur tracks, preserved for thousands of years. But how did they possibly get there?

By Tracy V. Wilson