John Perritano

John Perritano is an award-winning journalist and author, and regular contributor to HowStuffWorks. He likes writing about science, history, sports and anything else that helps pay the mortgage. You might have noticed that he often mentions his favorite family members — his dogs — in his articles. John holds a master’s degree in U.S. History from Western Connecticut State University, and has worked for many publishers including Time-Life, National Geographic, Scholastic and others. He lives in Southbury, Connecticut, on “Big Dog Farm.” It’s a real place. Honest. It even has a sign.

Recent Contributions

Most jellyfish are more bothersome than threatening, but the box jellyfish is so poisonous you might not make it out of the water alive.

By John Perritano

Mega Millions and the Powerball lotteries have collectively hit over $1 billion. But if you happen to win one (or both) how much will Uncle Sam want?

By John Perritano

Slipping your dog a little human food once in a while is fine, but be aware that some human foods are toxic to Fido.

By John Perritano

Advertisement

Biofuels -- or fuels made from plants like wheat, corn, soybean and sugarcane -- burn clean, release fewer pollutants and greenhouse gases, and are sustainable. Could these "energy crops" really be the end to our addiction to fossil fuels like oil?

By John Perritano

If you're moving from one city to another, pack some extra tissues because it's true: Seasonal allergies can flare up when you relocate and are exposed to new allergens.

By John Perritano

Some of the arguably greatest movie scenes of all time were filmed using Steadicams. These ingenious camera stabilizer systems allow filmmakers to produce moving, hand-held shots with no shakes at all. Can amateurs also take advantage of these super smooth stabilizers?

By Tom Harris & John Perritano

With the recent NFL draft, players are now negotiating contracts. Learn how the NFL's salary cap works, and how teams work under the salary cap with trades, signing bonuses, and other financial maneuvering.

By John Perritano

Advertisement

Blue light glasses are super popular these days. But do they work the way marketers promise?

By John Perritano

Keep meaning to create a home inventory for insurance? Don't wait until it's too late.

By John Perritano

You probably never think about flood insurance until you need it -- and then it's too late. But what's so different about this type of homeowners insurance and how can you be sure you're covered, just in case?

By John Perritano

Paying for homeowners insurance may seem like money down the drain -- until you actually need it. We'll tell you 10 reasons why you do.

By John Perritano

Advertisement

More than 17 million Americans live in manufactured homes. What do they know that the rest of us don't? Read on to find out the 10 advantages of a manufactured home.

By John Perritano

Is climate change to blame for king tides flooding coastal cities more often? Some scientists say yes.

By John Perritano

The ordinary housecat never seems to get the credit it deserves, even though 95 percent of cats in the U.S. are not purebred. Still these cats have distinctive markings to distinguish them from each other.

By John Perritano

Meteorologists have hurricane prediction down to a science, so preparedness should be the same thing too. Find out how to be ready if the big one's coming.

By Alison Cooper & John Perritano

Advertisement

Pressure washing can be so satisfying on some primal level, but the right equipment makes all the difference. And remember, safety first.

By John Perritano

Hurricanes are the strongest storms on the planet. How we categorize them has helped save lives.

By John Perritano

Cottonmouth snakes are often called water moccasins and are one of only four venomous snakes found in North America.

By John Perritano

Though a copperhead will bite if disturbed, and it is venomous, its bite is rarely fatal.

By John Perritano

Advertisement

Cross seas may looks super cool. But you never want to get caught up in the grid-patterned waves they generate.

By John Perritano

Despite being known as the "lesser panda," the red panda is so totally cute, we simply can't use that moniker. No way. Not now. Not ever.

By John Perritano

You've probably never seen one, but it looks like a waterbed in your yard. And trust us, if you do see one, you'll have an impulse to pop it.

By John Perritano

Garter snakes are harmless, very common and beneficially feed on slugs, leeches, large insects and small rodents in North American gardens.

By John Perritano

Advertisement

Scratching is a normal feline behavior. That's why many experts advise against putting your cat through a painful and unnecessary declawing procedure.

By John Perritano

Some Sphynx cats may look like mangled bags of brains, but these so-ugly-they're-cute-cats are among the friendliest of felines.

By John Perritano