Alia Hoyt

Contributing Writer

Alia is an Atlanta-based freelance writer who has contributed content to HowStuffWorks for going on a decade now. She’s also been published by TLC, Animal Planet, Yahoo! Shine, the ill-fated but completely awesome health and wellness site Upwave and a number of corporate clients. She holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Georgia (Go Dawgs!), and might someday get around to setting up a professional website. Until then, check her out on LinkedIn.

She and her husband are proud parents to three handsome, too-smart-for-their-own-good boys. Alia is a passably not terrible tennis player, lover of all things dance and music, brownie-obsessed, avid reader and off-key car singer. Her two favorite types of people are those who have a healthy sense of humor and those who actually read articles in their entirety before posting comments.

RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS


Reports of famous people being accused of sexually harassment have been all over news sites and social media. What does U.S. law actually say sexual harassment is?

It's freezing when you get into your car and you notice a light on your dashboard saying, 'check tire pressure.' You figure it's something to do with the cold, but must you fill up the tires fast?

Although women freely wear pants or shorts in everyday life, some sport associations still mandate skirts for their female athletes. Is this sexist, due to tradition or both?

Doulas don't have any medical training but many mothers depend on them to be in the delivery room to offer support. What do mothers like about doulas and how do you become one?

Are you one of those people who can't fall asleep without the sound of a fan? The reason may have something to do with your "sleep spindles."

Our instincts often tell us to do certain things — or avoid others — but we don't listen. Is this wise? How do we know when to obey our instincts?

A new study shows that belief in perceiving patterns correlated strongly with belief in conspiracy theories and the supernatural.

Wedding guest lists are getting smaller — and not just because weddings are getting more expensive. Brides and grooms have different expectations for weddings.

Psilocybin (the drug in magic mushrooms) provides relief for severely depressed people, according to new research. But there are some caveats.

No. 5 may seem like it's just hanging out there, but if you've ever injured it, you may have discovered how important it is for walking.

Let sleeping dogs lie? Maybe even in the same room, says a new study.

Experts are divided on whether animal hoarding should be considered a separate mental disorder from general hoarding.

A study showed that weight loss messages are more likely to work when both are actions ("eat more veggies," "do more exercise") rather than if one is an action and the other is an inaction ("eat more veggies," "eat less fat").

Now in its fifth edition, the DSM is the bible of diagnosing mental disorders in the U.S. Adding or removing a condition from the manual can greatly impact public opinion, as well as pharmaceutical and insurance practices.

A new breed of plastic surgeons is using social media to post video of themselves doing tricks or wearing costumes while performing surgery. But other doctors want to put a stop to this.

British scientists call for more awareness that diabetes can go into remission through weight loss.

Some people buy "clean urine" off the internet. Others borrow a deposit from a helpful friend. But can labs tell whether your pee is your own or someone else's?

Scientists have figured out why some objects stick more to each other. And it's a very cool trick.

A series of studies showed that including the word 'sorry' in a rejection actually made the rejected person feel worse.

Although left-handed people were thought to be "sinister" or "unnatural" in previous eras, we now know that left-handedness is natural for 10 percent of the population. And it can have some advantages over right-handedness too.