Charles Bryant

Charles Bryant

HowStuffWorks

Charles W.(Chuck) Bryant co-hosts the Stuff You Should Know podcast along with his trusty sidekick, Josh Clark. Bryant also wrote articles for the site, touching on a potpourri of subjects. He was born in Atlanta in the early 1970s under the sign of Pisces. Twenty-four years later, he earned an English degree at the University of Georgia. He spent the next decade traveling, pursuing creative endeavors and getting street smart. He and his wife-to-be moved back to Atlanta in 2004, with four pets in tow. He hooked up with HowStuffWorks shortly after co-host Josh was hired, and the pair bonded immediately over their love of Hunter S. Thompson, the fight-or-flight response and dive bars. In his off time, Chuck enjoys hanging out with his wife, cooking and playing in his old-man band. He loves his neti pot and hates cold bathroom floors.

Recent Contributions

Air conditioning has fundamentally changed how people experience the world. When it's hot outside, walking into an air-conditioned house is like walking into another season. How do air conditioners keep us cool?

By Marshall Brain, Charles W. Bryant & Sara Elliott

Along with motion pictures, Hollywood has a knack for creating other things: controversy and scandal. So which scandals are the juiciest -- and why?

By Charles W. Bryant & Allison Wachtel

Sure, someone can quit smoking. But if that person still yearns to light up a cigarette every day for the rest of his life, has he really changed? What does it take to alter behavior?

By Charles W. Bryant

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For filmmakers to tell a better story, the technology needs to advance. Which innovations have changed the way we see movies?

By Charles W. Bryant

The very term conjures up images of red balloons, burning beds and Eileen and Mickey spinning right round like a record. How do artists become one hit wonders?

By Charles W. Bryant

The human brain has a great capacity to adapt, rewire and grow. How can you help your noggin reach its ultimate potential?

By Charles W. Bryant

Eyewitness testimony can play a big part in a criminal trial. The problem is that eyewitness accounts aren't always accurate. What makes them so faulty?

By Charles W. Bryant

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Does waving your arms around while you talk affect how people perceive your words? Yes, it does. In fact, you may not need to "choose your words" at all.

By Charles W. Bryant

Does your morning jog cause your face to break out in pimples? If so, you're not alone. Why do workouts lead to breakouts, and what can you do to stop the cycle?

By Charles W. Bryant

Do you ever wonder whether your morning meeting was necessary? After all, why should it take six people to decide on a new coffee machine for the break room? Perhaps a pair could have handled this decision better than a group.

By Charles W. Bryant

If you're a problem sweater, then even a hot shower can lead to a relentless perspiring fiasco. How can you plan your day to avoid these embarrassing situations?

By Charles W. Bryant

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It's embarrassing when your sweat soaks straight through your clothes. Are there any fabrics that will keep your excessive sweating problem a secret?

By Charles W. Bryant

China is generally viewed as the next candidate for "superpower" distinction, but does that mean it will take over the world? What would that entail?

By Charles W. Bryant

While archaeological digs are still hands-on projects, some computer programs can help piece together a more complete picture of the site and even what its inhabitants might have looked like. What else can the software tell us?

By Charles W. Bryant

In "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade," Dr. Jones battles the Nazis for the Holy Grail. Did the Nazis really have an interest in archaeology? And if so, what fueled it?

By Charles W. Bryant

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In "The Raiders of the Lost Ark," Indiana Jones competes with grave-robbing Nazis for the lost Ark of the Covenant. But what defined Dr. Jones as legit and the Nazis as grave robbers?

By Charles W. Bryant

Each country and each region within each country has its own laws regarding the right to cultural property. So, how do you know which artifacts belong to the government and which are "finders keepers"?

By Charles W. Bryant

It's not so much about time as it is about money. What dictates how long an archeological team is permitted to dig at a particular site?

By Charles W. Bryant

Let's assume that long ago Homo sapiens communicated by grunting at one another. How and when did all those grunting sounds evolve into a verb tenses, clauses and proper nouns?

By Charles W. Bryant

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Long before sonnets, sestinas and short stories were historical accounts of kings carved onto clay tablets. Who were the first writers and what did they scribble?

By Charles W. Bryant