John Donovan

Contributing Writer

John is a freelance writer based in the suburbs of Atlanta. A longtime sports scribe with too much time covering college sports, the NFL, the NBA and Major League Baseball, he now writes on science, health, history, current events and whatever other weird non-sports stories that he and the editors at HowStuffWorks dream up. He has a journalism degree from Arizona State, a wife, a son, a dog that sheds too much and a bad case of eyestrain.

RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS


Taekwondo features dramatic, aerial, jumping, spinning kicks, but it's also about building character.

The story of the "Portuguese Oskar Schindler" who lost everything trying to save thousands during the Holocaust is finally being told by descendants of those he saved.

Coroners and medical examiners both help investigate unusual or violent deaths. The two jobs are different, but deeply connected.

The soldiers who stand vigil over the Tomb are the Sentinels of The Old Guard, a hand-picked group dedicated to honoring the memory of those who gave their lives for their country.

Since Google launched as a privately held company on Sept. 4, 1998, it's evolved from a two-man enterprise into a multibillion-dollar corporation. How did a Ph.D. project become one of the most influential companies in the world?

Ignoring a subpoena can land you in jail. So why would anybody do it?

When the U.S. president comes to town, it's time to get off the roads. As fast as you can.

The food we're feeding those incarcerated in the U.S. prison system is not only bad for their health, but it's also bad for John Q. Taxpayer's wallet.

We've been hearing the words constitutional crisis tossed around a lot lately. But what is one, really?

It's easy to equate "Caucasian" with "white." But that one word — Caucasian — touches on issues much deeper than skin color.

Sinking a hole-in-one is way more difficult than Tiger Woods and those other professionals make it look.

Defining plagiarism is not always cut-and-paste easy. But it usually involves deliberately passing off somebody else's original expression or creative ideas as one's own.

In fascism, the State is all that matters, and constant conquest is necessary to glorify that State. But how do you convince people to support a philosophy that denies their personal value? Is fascism really still alive today?

The U.S. Senate voted to quash the non-binding resolution without ever talking about it. But that doesn't mean it's dead in the water.

The suicides of two students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, as well as the suicide of a father of a child killed at Newtown Elementary highlight how the shock from a deep trauma remains long after for survivors.

We mostly associate postpartum depression with new moms. But studies show that new dads experience it, as well.

The Shelton family from Texas sent their first bouquet in 1998 after the Challenger disaster. And they haven't stopped since.

Emory historian and author Joseph Crespino's course aims to examine the history of right-wing ideology in the U.S. while at the same time teaching his students objectivity and empathy.

The most super plugged-in among us are learning how hard it is to truly break free of the five biggest tech companies. But even taking breaks from to recharge and unwind has benefits.

Public speaking can be debilitating for many people. What is it that causes so many of us to freeze up like a deer in headlights when it's time to talk in public?