John Donovan

John Donovan

Contributing Writer

John is a freelance writer based in the suburbs of Atlanta. A longtime sports scribe with too much time covering college sports, the NFL, the NBA and Major League Baseball, he now writes on science, health, history, current events and whatever other weird non-sports stories that he and the editors at HowStuffWorks dream up. He has a journalism degree from Arizona State, a wife, a son, a dog that sheds too much and a bad case of eyestrain.

Recent Contributions

President Joe Biden has earmarked $80 billion of his infrastructure plan to go to the U.S. railway system, namely Amtrak. But the biggest hurdle is getting Congress — and passengers — on board.

By John Donovan

When you think of the Secret Service, you probably think of the men in black guarding the president of the United States. But that's just a small part of the job. What else does this agency do?

By John Donovan

The Netflix documentary "This Is a Robbery" attempts to solve the 1990 Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum heist. Today, the 13 stolen pieces of artwork are worth around $500 million. Have you seen any of them?

By John Donovan

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The legal difference between murder and manslaughter is unmistakable, even if the final result of both of those crimes is the same. So what sets these charges apart in a court of law?

By John Donovan

Beulah Mae Donald's son Michael Donald (Michael left and Beulah right) was lynched by the Ku Klux Klan in Mobile, Alabama, in 1981. She fought back and took them down. Her story is now a four-part CNN Original Series.

By John Donovan

The United States still has five permanently populated territories. The 3.5 million residents are denied many of the same rights as mainland U.S. citizens. They want this to change.

By John Donovan

Hugging is way more than just how we greet our family and friends. And when COVID-19 abruptly ended this natural human connection, many of us were lost. Here's why.

By John Donovan

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The U.S. has been a nation in mourning for more than a year. But the normal rituals for mourning deceased loved ones have been anything but normal. How do we move on and when?

By John Donovan

Despite how hard investigators work, some crimes just baffle even the most gifted detectives. They go cold. That's where these nine cases stand. Will they ever be solved?

By John Donovan

CBG, or cannabigerol, is the building block to all other cannabinoids. It's touted as being the cure-it-all cannabis product, but does it live up to that hype?

By John Donovan

One day they were here and the next they simply disappeared. What happened to these 14 people? Will we ever know what happened to them or will their fates be unsolved forever?

By John Donovan

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Bugsy — nobody called him that to his face — Siegel was a shrewd mobster whose crew was dubbed "Murder, Incorporated" by the press. But that fast life got him killed by age 41.

By John Donovan

It's been a year since the World Health Organization officially declared the novel coronavirus a global pandemic. The last 12 months have been truly historic and life-changing in ways that we may not even yet recognize.

By John Donovan

Tetris was developed during the Cold War by a puzzle-happy programmer working for the Russian Academy of Sciences. So how did this addictive game break free of the Iron Curtain?

By John Donovan

We should know by now to wear a mask in public. But with more variants of coronavirus, should we wear two masks to stop the spread?

By John Donovan

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What's the difference between defamation, libel and slander? And what legal standards must be met to prove one in a court of law?

By John Donovan

These intense snowstorms can come out of nowhere. They may not last long, but their rapid snowfall and whipping winds can make them disastrous.

By John Donovan

The black mouth cur may look like a basic dog, but it's actually powerful, protective and sensitive. We'll tell you everything about them, including tips on training and how big they get.

By John Donovan

These colorful, chalk-like wafers hit the market in 1847. But they certainly aren't the most flavorful of treats. So why are they the classic candy we love to hate?

By John Donovan

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Membership on the social media app Parler exploded just after the Nov. 3 general election was called for President-elect Joe Biden. But why? And how does Parler work?

By John Donovan