Alia Hoyt

Contributing Writer

Alia is an Atlanta-based freelance writer who has contributed content to HowStuffWorks for going on a decade now. She’s also been published by TLC, Animal Planet, Yahoo! Shine, the ill-fated but completely awesome health and wellness site Upwave and a number of corporate clients. She holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Georgia (Go Dawgs!), and might someday get around to setting up a professional website. Until then, check her out on LinkedIn.

She and her husband are proud parents to three handsome, too-smart-for-their-own-good boys. Alia is a passably not terrible tennis player, lover of all things dance and music, brownie-obsessed, avid reader and off-key car singer. Her two favorite types of people are those who have a healthy sense of humor and those who actually read articles in their entirety before posting comments.

RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS


Some people buy "clean urine" off the internet. Others borrow a deposit from a helpful friend. But can labs tell whether your pee is your own or someone else's?

Scientists have figured out why some objects stick more to each other. And it's a very cool trick.

A series of studies showed that including the word 'sorry' in a rejection actually made the rejected person feel worse.

Although left-handed people were thought to be "sinister" or "unnatural" in previous eras, we now know that left-handedness is natural for 10 percent of the population. And it can have some advantages over right-handedness too.

Do public school dress codes and uniforms have any real value or are they sexist and arbitrary?

People are developing all kinds of packaging products that are tasty alternatives to landfill waste.

If you're one of those people who chooses invisibility as your desired superpower, it could mean you have a dark side.

New evidence shows that Big Tobacco specifically targeted U.S soldiers, because they were "less educated" among other reasons.

Although African Americans are 20 percent more likely to experience serious psychological distress than white Americans, they are far less likely to get help. Here's why.

Scientists have long known that much of the world's farmed salmon was deaf. Now they know why.

Originally tobacco companies opposed smoking cessation products like nicotine patches. Now they manufacture them. What accounted for the switch? And what did they know about these patches before the rest of us?

That driver who breezes down the highway shoulder in bad traffic could face serious penalties in the U.S. But sometimes, the lane is a perfectly legal option.

You may be able to get a will drawn up for free or free financial advice -- but these types of HR benefits often go begging. Here's why.

Scientists have known for a long time that goldfish make their own alcohol. Now, they've just discovered how they do it.

We explain why Ikea stores are designed like a lazy river, why their meatballs are considered "framing devices" and what's behind those darn flat pack boxes.

The U.S. is experiencing a widespread opioid epidemic, but some states are seeing especially high numbers of overdoses.

The Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation will air a show in fall 2017 featuring live sex, but it's for reasons you'd least likely expect.

You buy the right size but your shirt still bunches up. What gives?

More women are choosing to ingest their encapsulated placentas because of the supposed benefits they get after childbirth. But what does science have to say?

You've tried to conceive and can't, so you adopt. Then boom, you get pregnant. What gives?