Robert Lamb

Robert Lamb

Contributing Writer and Co-host of Stuff to Blow Your Mind

Robert Lamb spent his childhood reading books and staring into the woods — first in Newfoundland, Canada, and then in rural Tennessee. There was also a long stretch in which he was terrified of alien abduction. He earned a degree in creative writing. He taught high school and then attended journalism school. He wrote for the smallest of small-town newspapers before finally becoming a full-time science writer and podcaster. He’s currently a contributing writer at HowStuffWorks and has co-hosted the science podcast Stuff to Blow Your Mind since its inception in 2010. In his spare time, he enjoys traveling with his wife Bonnie, discussing dinosaurs with his son Bastian and crafting the occasional work of fiction.

Recent Contributions

How often have you watched a weather forecaster point to a spiral-shaped cloudy mass with a sense of dread and fascination? What fuels these ferocious storms?

By Marshall Brain, Craig Freudenrich, Ph.D. & Robert Lamb

The global oil supply can't meet the demand forever. Will the last drops of oil lead to widespread anarchy, the end of globalization and the relentless exploitation of previously protected drilling sites?

By Robert Lamb

So much of our cosmological history starts with the much-discussed Big Bang, but what led up to that cataclysmic moment? And did time even exist back then?

By Robert Lamb & Patrick J. Kiger

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It opened the door for numerous technological advances, from nuclear power and nuclear medicine to the inner workings of the sun. It even appeared in the title of a Mariah Carey album. Really. Can you define those three key variables, too?

By Robert Lamb

Almost 300 years after his death, Sir Isaac Newton remains one of the most influential thinkers in history. What are some of his most enduring inventions?

By Robert Lamb & Tristin Hopper

The island of Catan may be fictional, but the devoted fans this addictive board game generates are very real (and super strategic). Get sucked in, too, in How Settlers of Catan Works.

By Robert Lamb

Blue disease is piling up in London and Atlanta while the scientist and the medic bicker over the next best steps for fighting the rising tide of infection. If that sounds like fun, you're going to love the board game Pandemic.

By Robert Lamb

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The question of exactly what is human consciousness and how it came to be in the human mind has raged forever between philosophers, religious scholars and scientists, but does the theory of the bicameral mind explain it?

By Robert Lamb

Do we owe the emergence of language and self-reflection to the ancient and sustained consumption of psilocybin mushrooms?

By Robert Lamb

Does everyone's favorite Wookiee call Bigfoot family?

By Robert Lamb

Half man, half bull, this raging hybrid could be a perfect symbol of the oft-pondered dual nature of man.

By Robert Lamb

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Skinwalkers blur the line between human and beast. They're shape-shifting magical beings that belong to the Navaho spirit world.

By Robert Lamb

"The 26th century" doesn't roll off the tongue as easily as "the 21st century" does. But that hasn't stopped us from imagining what our hometown planet will be like in a few hundred years. Any guesses?

By Robert Lamb

The wall of water that struck northern Japan on March 11 claimed more than nearly 16,000 lives. While the human and cultural extents of this natural disaster are difficult to grasp, we can explain the physical properties that led to it.

By Robert Valdes, Nathan Halabrin & Robert Lamb

Scientist Sebastian Alvarado talks about his new book exploring the scientific underpinnings of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

By Robert Lamb

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Sure, he could pummel all his fellow beasts in a brawl, but could he stand the test of time?

By Robert Lamb

Humans routinely break the sound barrier in supersonic aircraft. Could everyone's favorite hedgehog do it, too?

By Robert Lamb

Well, heck yeah, we can, and we have. Let's take a look.

By Robert Lamb

On the one hand, nuclear power offers a clean energy alternative that decreases fossil fuel dependence. On the other, it summons images of quake-ruptured Japanese power plants leaking radioactive water. What happens in reactors in good times and bad?

By Marshall Brain, Robert Lamb & Patrick J. Kiger

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It's oddly comforting and intuitive to think things happen for a reason. And it's something that both creationists and conspiracy theory enthusiasts do.

By Robert Lamb

Turns out that evolutionary advantages can come with a price.

By Robert Lamb

Spanish researchers recently uncovered a new geometric shape that allows human tissue to curve. But how?

By Robert Lamb

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Have you ever seen a water bag hanging in a restaurant? It's not a design trend — some people say the bags repel flies. Does this method hold water?

By Robert Lamb

Fire will turn a human's teeth to dust. But what about a dragon's?

By Robert Lamb