Patty Rasmussen is a freelance writer based in the Atlanta area. She’s written about everything from Major League Baseball to economic development to the reason why calico cats are almost always female. Patty enjoys writing for HowStuffWorks because it means she’s usually picked first for trivia teams.

Recent Contributions

Edward Osborne "E.O." Wilson never grew out of his "bug period" as a child and, as a result, became one of the world's foremost experts on the subject of ants.

By Patty Rasmussen

History has been made as New York Governor Andrew Cuomo steps aside and Kathy Hochul becomes the state's first female governor.

By Patty Rasmussen

Between a yearlong delay and a still-ongoing global pandemic, Tokyo 2020 (or 2021 if you prefer) is not the Olympics anyone expected. But it's sure to be one we will never forget.

By Patty Rasmussen

Advertisement

A brilliant political strategist and Putin critic, Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny has been poisoned, imprisoned and recently ended a hunger strike. What's next for him?

By Patty Rasmussen

Dogs come in all shapes and sizes. But a few breeds stand out for being, well, exceptionally large. Which hold the records for being the biggest?

By Patty Rasmussen

You might think the difference is only in the name, but it's more than that. The slight variations in recipes, aging and even geography make whiskey and bourbon two different alcohols.

By Patty Rasmussen

With a very friendly personality, the Egyptian Mau can be trained to do almost anything a dog can do, from walking on a leash to fetching a ball.

By Patty Rasmussen

Advertisement

Magpies are much-maligned as harbingers of doom, thieves of shiny objects and songbird eggs, but they're smart, monogamous for life and actually hold funerals for one another.

By Patty Rasmussen

Reconciliation is a secret weapon the Senate uses to pass huge tax and spending bills quickly through Congress. So what is it, and what does it mean?

By Patty Rasmussen

The most obvious feature of Manx cats is their lack of a tail, but there is a lot more to them than that, including the fact that they have dog-like personalities and make great pets.

By Patty Rasmussen

Dame Jean Macnamara's research helped eventually lead to the Salk vaccine for polio. Her lasting legacy as an advocate for people with disabilities still lives on today.

By Patty Rasmussen

Advertisement

Getting lost in a book is one of life's greatest pleasures, but is a digital book just as pleasurable as a paper book? And which format is the best for learning?

By Patty Rasmussen

Halloumi cheese, delicious all by itself, is a great alternative to meat because, fried or grilled, the flavor can't be beat.

By Patty Rasmussen

Paprika comes from the dried Capsicum annuum variety of red peppers, and can range in flavor from sweet to very hot.

By Patty Rasmussen

This pretty pink fruit is part of the flower of a climbing cactus. The plant likely originated in Central America but you can find the fruit almost anywhere today.

By Patty Rasmussen

Advertisement

Its name is a derivative of a Mayan word for "hair" and by the looks of it you can see why. But how do you eat a rambutan and what does it taste like?

By Patty Rasmussen

When threatened, the slow loris licks venom secreted from a gland under its arm. Licked and loaded, the loris is ready to poison an attacker with a bite.

By Patty Rasmussen

Graham crackers were invented by Presbyterian minister Sylvester Graham as part of a radical 19th century diet. His goal? To curb joy and desire.

By Patty Rasmussen

What did these two U.S. presidents, who were also father and son, have in common beyond their first and last names?

By Patty Rasmussen

Advertisement

The name dik-dik comes from the repetitive 'dik' sound the tiny female dik-dik makes when she feels threatened.

By Patty Rasmussen

The wonderfully thick, dark syrup called molasses has been used in cooking for centuries and is still prized around the world today for its smokey sweetness.

By Patty Rasmussen

There's more to Australia's kookaburra than the cheery song you learned as a kid, but what is it that makes the kookaburra laugh?

By Patty Rasmussen

It's not uncommon for older dogs to lose their sight or even their hearing as they age. But can they lose their ability to smell, too?

By Patty Rasmussen

Advertisement

Candidates in U.S. elections spend an enormous amount of their time on swing states. But what exactly are these states and why are they so important?

By Ed Grabianowski & Patty Rasmussen

Technically they're called tanuki, but these furry critters might as well be called raccoon dogs because that's what they look like. So are they just as domesticated and loving as the canines we know?

By Patty Rasmussen