Patrick Kiger

Patrick J. Kiger has written for HowStuffWorks since 2008 covering a wide array of topics, from history and politics to pop culture and technology. He worked as a newspaper reporter for the Pittsburgh Press, and the Orange County Register in California, where he covered one of the biggest serial murder cases in U.S. history, and also as a staff writer at Baltimore Magazine. As a freelancer, Patrick has written for print publications such as GQ, Mother Jones and the Los Angeles Times, and on the web for National Geographic Channel, Discovery News, Science Channel and Fast Company, among others. In recent years, he's become increasingly interested in how technological advances are altering urban life and the design of cities, and has written extensively on that subject for Urban Land magazine. In his spare time, Patrick is a longtime martial arts student and a fan of crime fiction, punk rock and classic Hollywood films.

RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS


New Horizons takes photo from 3.79 billion miles (6.12 billion kilometers) away from Earth.

LiDAR scanning technology reveals huge Mayan civilization lost beneath the jungles of Guatemala.

Why are we still performing scientific tests on live animals?

Increasing scientific evidence shows that ultrafine particles are especially hazardous to health.

History has taught us that Harriet Tubman was a conductor for slaves on the Underground Railroad to freedom. But she had a second career as a Union spy and was also a champion for the elderly.

Human attempts to alter the Earth's natural systems could either successfully avert climate change or fail and cause even greater harm.

Cape Town, South Africa, population 3.7 million, could become the first city on the planet to run out of water. But it may not be the last.

Before World War II, a third of the world's population lived a territory controlled by a colonial power. How did this start and how did it end?

Scientists hope to grow transplant organs from patients' own stem cells, but success may still be a long way off.

Hotels/motels must balance guests' privacy with the safety of other guests and employees.

Emergency 911 systems sometimes have a tougher time finding cell phone callers than apps such as Uber.

The National Rifle Association focuses its considerable power on protecting the Second Amendment — the right to bear arms. But that was not their primary mission in their early years. So what changed?

Spermbots, originally designed to help lethargic human sperm fertilize eggs, also may be used to deliver chemotherapy to fight cervical cancer.

Contrary to his tweeted threat to North Korea, President Trump doesn't actually have a nuclear button.

The undersea cables that transmit the internet across the world are largely unprotected from terrorist or military attack.

The recent booming sounds heard in Alabama are part of a mysterious phenomenon that's occurred for years around the U.S. and elsewhere in the world.

The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor plant aims to demonstrate that nuclear fusion could be a viable source of power in the future.

In the absence of sound waves in the air, your brain will try to fill in the silence.

Defensive design is becoming increasingly important in cities around the world.

A handful of write-in candidates have been elected to both the U.S. House and Senate, but it's a difficult way to win office.