Mark Mancini

Contributing Writer

Mark Mancini is a freelance writer currently based in Texas. Over the years, he’s covered every subject from classic horror movies to Abe Lincoln’s favorite jokes. He is particularly fond of paleontology and has been reporting on new developments in this field since 2013. When Mark’s not at his writing desk, you can usually find him on stage somewhere because he loves to get involved with community theatre. And if you ever feel like trading puns for a few hours, he’s your guy.

RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS


June 21 marks the summer solstice, the longest day of the year. There's even a midnight baseball game in Alaska to celebrate the 24 hours of sunlight.

Someone just paid $2.36 million to take home an exquisite dinosaur skeleton. The sale has added to the growing scientific anxiety about the commodification of precious, irreplaceable fossils.

Both dry and over-saturated soil can contribute to flash flooding. Can anything be done to prevent them from becoming catastrophic?

Wouldn't it be nice if we could pull CO2 out of thin air and transform it into a fuel that's better for the environment?

Tsunamis are triggered by earthquakes and volcanic eruptions on the ocean's floor. But other massive waves are caused by wind and can come on suddenly and without warning.

The evidence is clear: Human activities — like the burning of fossil fuels — are the main driving force behind modern climate change.

It's easy to mistake a crow for a raven or vice versa. But the two birds are actually pretty different.

Not all animals have red blood flowing through their veins. Meet some our blue-blooded, green-blooded and, yes, transparent-blooded fellow creatures.

Will a town in southern Missouri be the epicenter of the next 'big one'?

To date 14 massive fissures have opened up near Kilauea, and the Big Island has been rocked by repeated earthquakes. Do these geological events foreshadow a massive volcanic eruption?

Some scientists think the existence of plate tectonics could be a prerequisite for life. So do they exist on other planets outside of Earth?

The mercury soared to over 122 degrees Fahrenheit in Nawkwabash, Pakistan. It could be the highest April temp ever recorded on the planet.

Snails can't pick and choose their shells like hermit crabs can. In fact, eviction means death. So how do those hard shells form over snails?

The oceans on planet Earth cycle through daily tidal changes. But the ground beneath our feet experiences tides of its own, too.

Massive mastodons roamed lower Kentucky during the last ice age. Jefferson was so fascinated by the creatures he was convinced they still roamed the plains in the 1800s.

NASA astronauts have to undergo serious training before becoming approved for a trip to space. But some of that training is certainly not what you'd expect.

There's a lot of junk orbiting in outer space. But what happens to those abandoned rockets and mission-related garbage when it goes to its final resting place?

Sand turned to glass at White Sands Missile Range. What do we know today about the remnants of the world's first nuclear blast?

The little flies have way more in common with us than you think. And it made them the perfect test animal to send to space.

University of Kansas paleontologists are comparing the bones of a new T. rex to determine if they've got a juvenile Tyrannosaurus or a mature Nanotyrannus on their hands.