Mark Mancini

Contributing Writer

Mark Mancini is a freelance writer currently based in Texas. Over the years, he’s covered every subject from classic horror movies to Abe Lincoln’s favorite jokes. He is particularly fond of paleontology and has been reporting on new developments in this field since 2013. When Mark’s not at his writing desk, you can usually find him on stage somewhere because he loves to get involved with community theatre. And if you ever feel like trading puns for a few hours, he’s your guy.

RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS


Before you declare which team you're on, we've got the breakdown on this auditory battle royal.

This ice-age asteroid crater isn't just the first of its kind. It may also be the smoking gun about what triggered the Younger Dryas, one of the most well-known examples of abrupt climate change.

This fin-backed pelycosaur roamed what's now the American Southwest 298 million years ago. And it's by far the oldest-known vegetarian tetrapod with gaps between some of its teeth, which is a big deal.

You know that sound synonymous with a certain laser blaster from a galaxy far, far away? Yeah. It sounds like that.

Ice cubes usually look cloudy and opaque in the middle, despite the fact that water is clear. What's the deal?

The idea behind the "fake" moon is to provide extra illumination to Chengdu, a city in China's Sichuan province. What could possibly go wrong?

With the Russian Soyuz spacecraft officially out of commission, what does that mean for space exploration? And more importantly, the crew on the International Space Station?

Noctilucent clouds form at high altitudes when drifting particles become coated with ice crystals at low temperatures.

The super-cool phenomenon of tidal bores happens in only a few places on the globe, and it takes a very specific set of conditions to occur.

The oceans' levels change daily across the globe. We know them as tidal changes. But what causes this constant shift in sea level and why is it more dramatic is some places than others?

Miraculously, many animals are able to ride out some of Mother Nature's most powerful storms. But how?

Do they even look different?

A Japanese billionaire art collector is the lucky ticket holder and he plans to invite a few artists to tag along — for free.

The tiny fly cocoons are between 34 and 40 million years old and contained well-preserved parasitic fossils.

A Columbia University scientist stumbled upon the first of seven new spiders while hunting for local frogs.

Comet 21P and comet 46P will swing past our planet during the month of September — and you won't need a telescope to see either.

The battle clearly ended in a slow death for both massive male beasts.

The villainous dinosaur from 'Jurassic Park' probably never had an affinity for water.

A 220 million-year-old turtle fossil discovered in China is the first of its kind ever to be found.

The Asian longhorned tick has shown up in six states so far, and nobody knows how it got here.