Mark Mancini

Contributing Writer

Mark Mancini is a freelance writer currently based in Texas. Over the years, he’s covered every subject from classic horror movies to Abe Lincoln’s favorite jokes. He is particularly fond of paleontology and has been reporting on new developments in this field since 2013. When Mark’s not at his writing desk, you can usually find him on stage somewhere because he loves to get involved with community theatre. And if you ever feel like trading puns for a few hours, he’s your guy.

RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS


Red snow? Yes. It totally exists. And while it might look cool, it's not exactly what you want to see from Mother Nature.

Fog and mist are similar scientifically. But what makes them different?

Could this exciting find help bridge the gaps between Africa's late Cretaceous fossil record and that of other continents?

The term "blue moon" dates back to at least the 16th century. Since then, it's had several different definitions, many of which are contradictory. So what's a blue moon today?

Germany's multi-billion-dollar investment in green energy seems to be paying off, but there's still more work to be done.

Does your parakeet understand the cardinal chirping outside its window? Can a pigeon's noises mean anything to a crow? Yes, it can.

The moon won't look blue though; it will likely look red.

Does the U.S. government have proof there is life from other worlds visiting Earth?

Scientists from The Ohio State University have drilled longest ice core from outside the poles.

Scientists have found microbes in Antarctica that somehow survive just on gases in the atmosphere. This could have some exciting possibilities for determining how alien life on other planets could stay alive.

Although we've known it exists for decades, nobody knows exactly why there's a humming noise at the bottom of the ocean. But we're one step closer now that scientists have been able to record the sound underwater.

If geology has taught us anything about Earth's history, it's that nothing is permanent. And that goes for mountain ranges, all of which are constantly rising and falling.

Paleontologists in China hit the jackpot of fossilized pterosaur eggs.

Geologists agree that the world's landmasses were once all one supercontinent. Is it likely to happen again?

That's one small step for man ... one giant lie to mankind?

How galaxies get their shapes and evolve is widely debated.

Crocodiles are known to eat just about anything. But sharks? A scientific team found evidence that they've chowed down on those predators too.

Animals leave their marks on the ecosystem in ways you probably never imagined.

Why not cylindrical? Or even cube-shaped?

Environmental researchers found that large river systems with lots of surrounding residents are the sources of plastic debris in the oceans.