Jonathan Strickland

Jonathan Strickland

HowStuffWorks

Jonathan Strickland has always loved technology. As a kid, Jonathan spent countless hours playing games like River Raid and Pitfall on his Atari 2600. He grew up during the early years of the personal computer era and cut his teeth on an Apple IIe and the Texas Instruments TI-99/4A computers. He earned his bachelor's degree in English Literature from the University of Georgia. He focused primarily on medieval and Renaissance literature and can still rattle off several Shakespearean monologues (and he'll do so unless you stop him).

Jonathan is a former staff writer and eventually senior writer for the HowStuffWorks electronics and computer channels. He currently hosts the podcast TechStuff. He lives in a funky part of Atlanta filled with poets, artists, actors and assorted crazy people — he fits right in. His hobbies include writing fiction, acting and learning to play the ukulele and mandolin.

Recent Contributions

Most scientists agree that human interference in the environment has something to do with the recent trend of rising temperatures on the Earth. If we got ourselves in this pickle, what can we do about it?

By Jonathan Strickland

Believe it or not, to get to space and back, NASA relies on a piece of technology that's been around for centuries. Just what is a gimbal, anyway?

By Jonathan Strickland

People have been fighting with one another longer than humans have recorded their history. But what was the first war?

By Jonathan Strickland

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Wouldn't it be nice to grow crops that grew 50 percent more than current varieties? How about a strain of vegetables that were safe from insects without using pesticides? Agricultural biotechnology can do that.

By Jonathan Strickland & Austin Henderson

At one time, sharing files between computers meant carrying a box of punch cards from one machine to another. The Internet changed all that, but who's responsible for creating this network of networks?

By Jonathan Strickland

Less than 100 miles from Las Vegas, is the most famous secret military installation on the planet: Area 51. For decades, the U.S. government refused to acknowledge it existed. But now, the secret is out.

By Jonathan Strickland & Patrick J. Kiger

To understand the universe better, scientists from all over the world are going to harness the power of an enormous machine -- the Large Hadron Collider.

By Jonathan Strickland

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Why are governments, private businesses, and academic institutions collaborating to research develop and produce fuel cells? Learn how fuel cells work and how efficient they really are.

By Karim Nice, Jonathan Strickland, Talon Homer & Yara Simón

Winning wars sometimes requires innovative new tools, so it seems possible that new technologies are developed in the heat of battle. But is all technology born from conflict?

By Jonathan Strickland

Nanotechnology is one of the hot buzzwords of the 21st century. You know that it has to do with things that are very small, but just what are the implications of technology on the molecular scale, anyway?

By Jonathan Strickland

The occasional sunspot can interrupt communications here on Earth. But major solar flares have the potential to cause more havoc. Could a flare-up wipe out all our electronics?

By Jonathan Strickland

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Welcome to the wonderful and weird world of nanowires. Scientists can adapt this incredibly thin material for a number of uses, whether as a fiber-optic nanowire or to build increasingly smaller microprocessors. They're even used in medical implants.

By Jonathan Strickland

Ever wonder why your computer works the way it does? We did, too. So we took one apart to see what all of it does. So what's inside a computer?

By Jonathan Strickland

Advances in technology have allowed microprocessor manufacturers to double the number of transistors on a CPU chip every two years. How long can they keep this up?

By Jonathan Strickland

The days of the cell phone are numbered. Superior technology has already surpassed it and is now moving on to the next level. Which cutting-edge technologies are here to stay and which are flashes in a pan?

By Jonathan Strickland

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Parasites are creepy to begin with. They live on or in a host, including humans. Some even lay eggs in our skin!

By Jonathan Strickland

Yes, it's still around. Second Life is a 3D virtual world where you can live in a castle, fly to dance clubs and change your appearance with a click of your mouse. So what's up with it now?

By Jonathan Strickland & Chris Pollette

Electronic books have been out for years, though none of them met with much success — until the Amazon Kindle. What's so special about this little device?

By Jonathan Strickland & Chris Pollette

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We've heard a lot about Web 2.0 and Web 3.0. But what Web 1.0, the one that started it all?

By Jonathan Strickland

Thanks to improvements in manufacturing, computer processors are constantly getting faster and smaller. These days, it seems like computers are just about everywhere. What kinds of machines will we be using in 2050?

By Jonathan Strickland

Cloud storage sounds like a meteorological phenomenon, but it's a method of keeping computer files on a networked drive. It's very convenient, but are your files safe?

By Jonathan Strickland

American Sign Language (ASL) is one of the fastest growing languages of study in the United States. Learn about the history of ASL, how it's used and how it differs from other sign languages in the United States and around the world.

By Jonathan Strickland

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The Internet lets you transfer information around the world in seconds. But the pieces of your file may not all get there the same way. How does all that data get where it's supposed to go without getting lost?

By Jonathan Strickland

Now that the Internet has become such an important part of our everyday lives, it's hard to imagine what life would be like without it. Could the Internet collapse? What would happen if it did?

By Jonathan Strickland