Jesslyn Shields

Jesslyn Shields is a freelance science writer working out of Athens, Georgia. She writes about brand new research for HowStuffWorks. Since 2010, Jesslyn's written science news and content for educational videos, because she loves to always have something new to yammer on about at parties. You can find her online at www.jesslynshields.com

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Watch out if you want a bite of this bad boy. The Asian common toad has been spotted in Madagascar, and conservation ecologists are worried sick about it.

Germinated in medieval times, the pine named Italus now holds the record as Europe's oldest tree.

You can't tell a book by its cover, and you can't tell a squid by its Nosferatu getup.

New research suggests the asteroid impact that killed the dinosaurs probably burned Earth's forests, requiring modern birds' common ancestors to live on the ground.

Sea spiders don't do anything by the book, and researchers have just gotten to the bottom of how they breathe.

Researchers have successfully used RNA to transfer a memory from one sea snail to another.

No college degree in the world could prepare you to be the Duckmaster at the Peabody Hotel in Memphis, Tennessee.

Since 2004, cases of diseases spread by ticks and mosquitoes have tripled in the U.S.

The microwave oven is a ubiquitous appliance in kitchens today, but don't we all have that one holdout friend who still refuses to own one?

Men's garments are made with deep, plentiful pockets, while women are forced to stash their keys in their bra. What's wrong with this picture?

The world's largest cockroach farm turns out 6 billion bugs a year.

Scientists are hoping to use the enzyme to break down huge amounts of plastic.

Plastic may be the longest-lasting legacy of human beings on this planet. But there are lots of ways, big and small, that we can all stop using it. Today.

The Evolutionarily Distinct and Globally Endangered (EDGE) Reptiles List includes 100 reptiles, including the punk rock Mary River turtle, that have lineages dating back to the Age of Dinosaurs.

Scientists have a new lead on what gives some animals the ability to sense Earth's magnetic field.

Compared to sports drinks, bananas might be tops at helping us power through workouts and heal faster on the other end.

A new study finds that, on average, it takes 264 gallons (1,000 liters) of water to make a single chocolate bar. Now that's a hefty footprint.

It pays to be brainy when you're a ring-tailed lemur.

A woman who gave birth posthumously also had a hole in her skull from a procedure to treat a pregnancy-related complication.

Viagra may be known mainly for treating erectile dysfunction, but it could also help prevent a deadly form of cancer.