Jesslyn Shields is a freelance science writer working out of Athens, Georgia. She writes about brand new research for HowStuffWorks. Since 2010, Jesslyn's written science news and content for educational videos, because she loves to always have something new to yammer on about at parties. You can find her online at www.jesslynshields.com

Recent Contributions

A bird thought to be extinct for 170 years is rediscovered in Borneo.

By Jesslyn Shields

Science requires that we make guesses, which is why we have confidence intervals.

By Jesslyn Shields

The world's most beloved chalk was pulled back from the brink of extinction, to the relief of the world's mathematicians and chalk enthusiasts.

By Jesslyn Shields

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In the search for Cleopatra's tomb, a team of archaeologists was surprised by two mummies with gold foil-covered tongues. What was the reason for this strange burial custom?

By Jesslyn Shields

One of the weirdest organisms on Earth has a predictably quirky method of deciding where to go and what to do.

By Jesslyn Shields

Badgers love to dig — one den, or "sett," in southern England is thought to cover a territory of over a square mile and have up to 100 entrances.

By Jesslyn Shields

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Pancake ice is fun and rare in some places, but it might be speeding up the warming of the ocean in the Arctic.

By Jesslyn Shields

The tin or lead pins medieval pilgrims wore on their hats or cloaks, some playfully risqué, were meant to protect against plague.

By Jesslyn Shields

This dragon is illuminated every night, spitting out both fire and water on weekends and holidays, as it sways its way over the Han River in Da Nang.

By Jesslyn Shields

Savant syndrome is a rare condition in which someone with significant mental disabilities demonstrates certain unexplained extraordinary abilities, such as playing music or remembering prodigious amounts of information.

By Jesslyn Shields

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The cartoon Roadrunner beep-beeped his way through the desert, outfoxing Wile E. Coyote every time, but the real bird can run up to 27 mph and, in some Native American traditions, offers protection from evil spirits.

By Jesslyn Shields

Archaeologists have long debated whether Neanderthals buried their dead. Newly interpreted evidence indicates they did.

By Jesslyn Shields

Organisms not related to each other can develop similar physical attributes without even exchanging notes.

By Jesslyn Shields

Flemish giants, also known as "Flemmies," make great pets, but the question is, how did they get so big?

By Jesslyn Shields

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Niels Bohr proposed the model of the atom that we still learn in school today, even though it's technically incorrect.

By Jesslyn Shields

We are who we are because of the genes our parents pass to us, but what happens when both parents contribute the same version of a specific gene?

By Jesslyn Shields

It's an important question, so come with us and we'll show you how to figure it out.

By Jesslyn Shields

You've probably heard of a tumor, but what about a neoplasm? How similar are they and are they always cancerous?

By Jesslyn Shields

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A zorse is one strange looking horse. That's because it's the product of a zebra stallion and a female horse.

By Jesslyn Shields