Jesslyn Shields

Jesslyn Shields is a freelance science writer working out of Athens, Georgia. She writes about brand new research for HowStuffWorks. Since 2010, Jesslyn's written science news and content for educational videos, because she loves to always have something new to yammer on about at parties. You can find her online at www.jesslynshields.com

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One theory about the fate of everybody's favorite female aviator is that her remains ended up as food for coconut crabs on a remote island in the South Pacific. But why?

In recent years, three mummified cubs from an extinct lion species have emerged from the Russian permafrost. Cloning might be possible, but is it wise?

When we've really got to urinate, kids and adults alike do the pee-pee dance. What are the theories behind the fidgeting?

New research suggests Neanderthals went extinct, not because we outcompeted them, but because we took over their ecological niche.

Where on the planet can you visit to see with your own eyes the tracks left by dinosaurs? Fossilized dino footprints might be just outside your back door, but here are good places to start.

Cosmic rays sound like something out of sci-fi, but they're helping scientists unlock the secrets of one of the oldest human-made structures in the world.

Nearly half of all U.S. adults who have food allergies developed at least one of them during adulthood.

Although we're told to start getting screened for colorectal cancer at 50, new research suggests we should start earlier.

Adolescence is a notoriously tough time for people with Type 1 diabetes, but a study shows that giving them money might help them manage the illness more effectively.

Crabs exposed to Prozac are more careless in their foraging behavior, and more aggressive toward members of their own species.

It seems like flying cockroaches want to dive bomb your face. Are they aggressive? Defensive? Or maybe it's all just in your scared ape mind.

Fossils of a "missing link" may never be found, but new research shows apes' last common ancestor may have been smaller than previously thought.

Things are getting a little more interesting out in Pluto's neighborhood.

Although spending time upside down can be good for overall health, doing so eventually can be fatal under the right conditions.

New research digs into historic volcano fatalities to explore how, where and whom a volcano is most likely to kill.

Mapping the genome of the King of Fruits reveals the source of its smell, and may present opportunities to develop pharmaceuticals.

We need lithium for electronics and batteries. Global supplies are running short, but domestic supervolcanoes might hold the U.S. lithium motherlode.

Unusual street art in Rapid City, the "City of Presidents," aims to personalize the presidency.

Skipping breakfast might seem innocuous, but a new study finds it associated with atherosclerosis and a wider waistline.

Panda populations are flourishing, and that's good news. But with the threats of infrastructure and livestock, can that trend last?