Dave Roos

Contributing Writer

Dave is a freelance journalist who has contributed hundreds of articles to HowStuffWorks since 2007. Raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Dave attended Duke University where he earned the B.A. in comparative religious studies that has served him so well. Dave began freelancing when he and his wife moved to Mexico in 2003, publishing articles about Mexican food and culture in The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times and Newsweek. Nearly 15 years and three kids later, Dave and his family recently moved back to Mexico and just might stay a while.


How did spring break become a booze-fueled rite of passage for American college students? Can we blame this one on the ancient Greeks?

Some U.S. restaurants' experiments with dropping tipping in favor of higher menu prices did not catch on with consumers. Is there a profit point when it would make sense to drop tipping?

Fighting the funk brought on by an animal decomposing inside your car engine can be hard, but not impossible. Here's how to do it.

A pioneer in the environmental movement, Marjory Stoneman Douglas was a journalist and activist who fought to save these important Florida wetlands from development.

The popularity of neighborhood social networks keeps exploding. But building community comes with some unintended consequences.

Why is it so hard to keep weight off after losing it? One study suggests it's because your body wants you to put it back on.

Leftover pizza is practically a staple in college dorms and bachelor pads, but is it safe to eat at room temperature?

Is there something about American suburban high school culture that makes it fertile ground for school shootings? One researcher says 'yes.'

Britt Marie Hermes started out at a naturopath. Now, she writes a blog criticizing their practices, which has landed her in a lawsuit. At a time when naturopaths are fighting for more state licensing and insurance coverage, she shares her story.

The U.S.'s long-standing cash bail system produces two very different outcomes depending on how much money the defendant can scrape together.

The prosperity gospel is one of the most popular forms of Christianity in the entire world. But where did it come from and how did it get so big? And why do critics say it gives a false picture of Christianity?

A startling two-thirds of gun deaths in the U.S. are suicides, not homicides. Some suicide prevention advocates and gun rights supporters are coming together to educate people about suicide risk.

The flick, the shake and the micromort are just three of the unusual measurements that scientists use.

Even items with the word 'penny' in their name, like penny candy, cost more than a cent. What does a penny buy in America these days?

The most sweeping tax overhaul in decades became law in December 2017. What should U.S. taxpayers do in 2018 to benefit from the tax code changes?

Whether your account has been hacked or you've lost your private key code, do you have any recourse for recovering your lost bitcoin?

You may know the story of how Fletcher Christian and his men mutinied aboard the ship the Bounty. But what was the voyage all about in the first place?

Bitcoin had a banner 2017, trading at up to around $20,000 per unit. So, hopes were high for its debut on the futures market in December. How is this cryptocurrency faring in the real world of financial regulation?

Controversy surrounds the removal of public monuments honoring the U.S. Confederacy. But who determines which monuments go up or come down?

The real story about the roots of infidelity and monogamy is far more complicated than whether you have the "cheating gene."