Dave Roos

Contributing Writer

Dave is a freelance journalist who has contributed hundreds of articles to HowStuffWorks since 2007, with a specialty in personal finance, economics and business. Raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, he attended Duke University where he earned the B.A. in comparative religious studies that has served him so well.

Dave began freelancing when he and his wife moved to Mexico in 2003, publishing articles about Mexican food and culture in The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times and Newsweek. Nearly 15 years and three kids later, Dave and his family recently moved back to Mexico and just might stay a while.


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS


Good luck predicting the economic future; even the experts get it wrong. But there are sure warning signs to look for when a recession is ahead.

How exactly did these two fried friends get together and become so beloved in the U.K.? Like many a national cuisine, its roots started in faraway lands.

At least not in nature. Scientists have discovered the two gene families that play key roles in making fruits and vegetables either round or long. Could a square fruit be on the horizon?

What's as strong as steel but half the weight; able to live in almost any body part and an important part of both airplanes and cake frosting? Would you believe, titanium?

Started in 1882, this beautifully ornate church is expected to be finally completed in 2026. It was the vision of architect Antoni Gaudí who conceived of it as a "forest in stone."

Jimmy Hoffa mysteriously disappeared on July 30, 1975 and hasn't been seen since. We talked to one expert with an ingenious theory about what might have actually happened.

Executive orders are directives handed down from the president without input from the legislative or judiciary branches of government. Presidents often use them when Congress won't approve a favored regulation. But should they?

Most of the biggest bands in the world are made up of young guys, even today. But what's happened to the ladies?

Sometimes referred to as the "cuddle hormone," oxytocin is released during sex and breastfeeding. But does it make you fall in love with someone or just bond you more with someone you already love?

The Dorasan train station was built near the DMZ to connect North and South Korea. But the only people using this fully functional station are some tourists.

The ancient city of Babylon was a byword for wickedness in the Bible. But what is the real story? And how did Saddam Hussein try to bring it back?

You'll deal with a lot of different people in your quest to buy or sell a home: a realtor, inspector and lender. But the one who might have the most power over the outcome is the appraiser. Learn how to get the best appraisal.

Which three presidents died on July 4? What's the Horribles Parade? And, should America be celebrating on July 2 instead?

Just like bees, wasps are pollinators that are also endangered. But you rarely hear anyone pleading to save wasps. A new study finds out why wasps are despised by the public and researchers alike.

Yep, socks were invented for a reason.

American presidents are chosen by the electoral college rather than the popular vote. But a measure to circumvent that is gaining steam. So far, 15 states have signed on, but is it constitutional?

In about 100 years, Pentecostalism went from a startup renewal movement to the second-largest Christian denomination in the world, bested only by Catholics. What caused that astonishing rise?

Before the widespread use of DNA, establishing the paternity of a child was a tricky business. Ever heard of the oscillophore?

A "trail of tears and death" is how a Choctaw leader described the experience of his people being forcibly removed from their tribal homelands and sent west of the Mississippi. How many people were affected?

Some 7,000 clickers were given to troops landing at Normandy, but only a few remain. Now the company that made them is trying to locate them. What were the clickers used for and what happened to them?