Dave Roos

Contributing Writer

Dave is a freelance journalist who has contributed hundreds of articles to HowStuffWorks since 2007. Raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Dave attended Duke University where he earned the B.A. in comparative religious studies that has served him so well. Dave began freelancing when he and his wife moved to Mexico in 2003, publishing articles about Mexican food and culture in The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times and Newsweek. Nearly 15 years and three kids later, Dave and his family recently moved back to Mexico and just might stay a while.


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS


Experts can't help noticing that people who are now addicted to opioids are characterized as victims, while crack addicts were labeled as criminals. Is race the reason?

Among the tragic cases of teens being cyberbullied, there is a sad subgroup of teens who cyberbully themselves. Who does this and why?

You were probably used to red squiggles showing up for spelling errors and green ones for grammatical errors in Microsoft Word documents. But why was the red usually right and the green usually wrong?

Why do we love looking at a perfectly stacked display of soup cans or six flower petals around a stamen? Our brains seem wired for it -- but why?

Scientists and treasure hunters have searched for the fabled Nazi Gold Train for decades, but efforts have stepped up recently, thanks to new technology. A new group of searchers think they have a unique angle.

Their pioneering story is little known, but from 1967 to 1975, an ambulance crew recruited from a poverty-stricken black neighborhood in Pittsburgh became the first set of trained EMTs in America.

When your favorite restaurant ends up on the TV news with a C rating from the health inspector, does that mean you should never eat there again? Not so fast.

Public Enemy may have rapped that 911 was a joke in 1990, but in the 21st century, ambulances have to take their servicing seriously.

Hotel security in the U.S. today seems to be where airport security was before 9/11. Will it change after the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history?

We think we know what gets censored out of movies shown on airplanes – like language and plane crashes. But the rise of streaming has changed the rules and added some cultural dimensions.

How did this football club, initially composed mainly of Germans and Brits, become the repository of the hopes and dreams of an independent Catalan nation? And what would happen to the club if Catalan seceded from Spain?

Many parents feel torn between funding their own retirement and paying for their kids' college education. But financial experts are united on which one should take priority.

The relationship between pro sports and expression of patriotism, like playing the National Anthem, is a uniquely American phenomenon. And a fairly recent one.

Will subscription music services – and the unlikely comeback of vinyl – save the music album from extinction?

Is it better to give cash or goods? And which organizations should you support? Find out the best ways to really help people in times of disaster.

Credit monitoring bureau Equifax was hacked and is offering fraud monitoring services for free. But experts say they're pretty useless.

The Danish people are among the happiest on the planet. Here are 5 reasons why.

Spending goes up on construction and repairs after a disaster. But experts say it doesn't make the local economy better.

Some countries have started allowing people to choose an 'X' on their passports to indicate an unspecified sex. Many people argue that's not enough and gender classifications don't belong on government documents at all.

'You really can't describe to anybody what it's like to sit through a hurricane,' says Ruth Clark, who lived through Hurricanes Camille and Katrina.