Tara Yarlagadda

Tara Yarlagadda

Contributing Writer

Tara is a multimedia storyteller and freelance writer of culture, science, travels, soul-sucking books, movies/TV and great eats. In addition to HowStuffWorks, Tara has been published in The New York Times 360, PBS NewsHour, Paste, Bedford + Bowery, Hyperallergic and The New Food Economy. She’s also worked as a fact-checker for The New York Times. Before subsisting on instant ramen as a freelance journalist, Tara received an M.A. in Literary Reportage from New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute and a B.A in Political Science/South & Southeast Asian Studies from the University of California – Berkeley. Follow her on Twitter @TaraYarla, for writing-related musings and check out her website here: tarayarlagadda.com.



Recent Contributions

On National Cheeseburger Day, we're celebrating — what else? — the all-American cheeseburger.

By Tara Yarlagadda

At 91, Dolores Huerta, the activist who inspired Barack Obama's "Yes, we can" campaign, continues to work tirelessly developing leaders and advocating for the working poor, women and children.

By Tara Yarlagadda

There are some 50 Chinatowns in America and hundreds more in other countries. What led to their creation and will they survive into the next century?

By Tara Yarlagadda

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There are two types of huskies and they both look an awful lot like malamutes, so it's no wonder people can't tell them apart.

By Tara Yarlagadda

This stunning sight is totally natural and totally cool.

By Tara Yarlagadda

Asian Americans continue to challenge injustice and a rising tide of hate crimes directed at them, while mainstream narratives fail to address their bravery, history and struggles.

By Tara Yarlagadda

Many scientists say that the response to climate change will require planting new trees. A whole lot of them.

By Tara Yarlagadda

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It is the largest animal ever to exist on the planet.

By Tara Yarlagadda

It may seem like just the cutest thing in the world to you, but owning a pet monkey is a really bad idea. Here's why.

By Tara Yarlagadda

Also known as winter radish, icicle radish, Chinese radish and Japanese radish, daikon has the crunchy texture of a red radish, but with a much milder taste.

By Tara Yarlagadda

This banana has soft, sweet flesh and tastes a lot like vanilla custard or ice cream. One scoop or two?

By Tara Yarlagadda

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This native New Zealand 'liquid gold' honey may make you want to abandon the bear. But does it really have medicinal properties, and why is it so expensive?

By Tara Yarlagadda

Aaah, mushrooms – all those beautiful shapes and colors, textures and flavors. But what about the dirt and debris that always seem to come along? We find out whether it's best to wash them, brush them or just go au naturel with them.

By Tara Yarlagadda

This warm, fluffy, donut-like treat, stuffed with cream or fruit-based filling and savory flowers, is a pre-Lent staple in Poland and a Fat Tuesday tradition in the U.S.

By Tara Yarlagadda

By studying these geological formations here on Earth, we may be able to learn how to live on other planets.

By Tara Yarlagadda

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Taro is a starchy root tuber that looks a lot like a potato, but it's rich in polyphenols, giving it a bigger bang as a healthy alternative.

By Tara Yarlagadda

The word "hibachi" has its origins in Japan, where it translates to "fire pot."

By Tara Yarlagadda

Shallots belong to the same family as onions, leeks, scallions and garlic. They look like small, elongated onions but have a sweeter, milder flavor.

By Tara Yarlagadda

Heart of palm, with a similar taste and texture to artichoke heart, is a staple in Central and South America and a healthy addition to almost any menu.

By Tara Yarlagadda

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The modern city of Istanbul, Turkey, has a long and tumultuous history. Once known as Constantinople, it was the capital of the Ottoman Empire, the center of cultural and religious activity and a hub for trade in Eurasia.

By Tara Yarlagadda

Set over Bear Run, a tributary of the Youghiogheny River in the mountains of southwestern Pennsylvania, Fallingwater is perhaps the architect's best-known work.

By Tara Yarlagadda

If you're a gamer, you've got Jerry Lawson to thank for inventing the first commercial home video game console with interchangeable game cartridges.

By Tara Yarlagadda

You've heard all about the exploits of Amelia Earhart, but do you know the story of Bessie Coleman, the first Black American woman to receive a pilot's license?

By Tara Yarlagadda

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Kate Warne was bold enough to walk into the Pinkerton Agency in 1856 and step into her role as the first female detective in U.S. history.

By Tara Yarlagadda

The tiny Southeast Asian country of Cambodia has achieved a worldwide reputation for perfecting the art of shadow puppetry. But the practice is in danger of dying out.

By Tara Yarlagadda