Stephanie Vermillion

Stephanie Vermillion

Contributing Writer

Stephanie Vermillion is a freelance writer and photographer from Cincinnati, Ohio. She covers food, beer, wildlife and travel for HowStuffWorks. When she's not writing, Stephanie spends her free time playing with her rescue pup, Harry, or sampling new craft beers — in the name of research, of course. Find her online at www.stephanievermillionstudio.com.

Recent Contributions

Death Valley hit 130 degrees Fahrenheit again Sunday July 11, 2021. That is only the fifth time in recorded history temperatures have reached 130 degrees on Earth. Why is it so hot here and how can anything survive in such brutal conditions?

By Stephanie Vermillion

The mint julep is as synonymous with the Kentucky Derby as big hats and seersucker suits. But how did this simple drink from the 1700s wind up at the world's most famous horse race?

By Stephanie Vermillion

Lake Baikal is a massive, ancient lake in the mountainous Russian region of Siberia. It's home to nearly 4,000 different species, earning it the nickname the 'Galapagos of Russia.'

By Stephanie Vermillion

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We know wine collectors age their wine. But what about beer? There's a movement of beer enthusiasts dabbling in aging beer, too. Do the same rules apply?

By Stephanie Vermillion

Are these strong and dependable animals all the same? If so, why the different names? If not, what makes them different?

By Stephanie Vermillion

It's slimy, stringy and even quite pungent, but natto is also chock full of nutrients. So what is this superfood that's been a staple in Japan for thousands of years?

By Stephanie Vermillion

Men at Work sang about the stuff in their 1981 hit 'Down Under.' But what is this thick, black spread anyway?

By Stephanie Vermillion

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No yeast to bake bread? No problem. You can start baking sourdough bread in about a week once you've made your own sourdough starter. We'll tell you how.

By Stephanie Vermillion

Chopsticks have been in use since 1200 B.C.E. And today more than 20 percent of the world's population uses chopsticks as its primary utensil.

By Stephanie Vermillion

This starchy, staple fruit that grows in the tropics has the potential to provide food security to millions. So what exactly is it and who's eating it?

By Stephanie Vermillion

Size is the most obvious difference between king and snow crab, but the distinctions don't end there. We'll tell you what makes each crab special.

By Stephanie Vermillion

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You might think prosecco and Champagne are the same because they both have bubbles, but you'd be wrong. So what's makes a quality prosecco?

By Stephanie Vermillion

Americans love frozen desserts. But ask someone what the difference is between ice cream, gelato, frozen custard and frozen yogurt and you'll probably get a blank stare. So how do these popular treats differ?

By Stephanie Vermillion

You don't have to fry your food when you can get the same crispy results with hot air.

By Stephanie Vermillion

Those leftover cheese rinds can be valuable ingredients that you can harness into new recipes. We'll show you simple ways to use them as flavor enhancers.

By Stephanie Vermillion

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Condensed milk and evaporated milk may have similar names, but the two are very different. We explain when to use which one.

By Stephanie Vermillion

Both are essential fats for baking, but they bring different flavors, textures and even appearances to the end product. So is one better than the other?

By Stephanie Vermillion

Cities around the world are banning foie gras, the French delicacy of fattened duck liver because the labor-intensive force-feeding process is considered unethical.

By Stephanie Vermillion

The U.S. banned the gooseberry back in the early 1900s because it was a host for white pine blister rust disease. But now few states prohibit the tart berry, so eat up!

By Stephanie Vermillion

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Escargot is a delicacy of snails that's common in many European countries like France, Spain and Portugal. But what do snails even taste like and how are they prepared?

By Stephanie Vermillion

These two Italian cheeses may look similar on the outside. But it's what's revealed on the inside that makes them so deliciously different.

By Stephanie Vermillion

Kohlrabi is a cruciferous vegetable, just like cabbage, with a slightly sweeter flavor. It's also known as a German turnip and can be eaten raw or cooked.

By Stephanie Vermillion

During 'Dry January,' you give up alcohol for the month in order to detox and start the new year off right. But does it typically lead to binge drinking in February?

By Stephanie Vermillion

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Latkes are potato pancakes that are commonly eaten during Hanukkah. What's behind this delicious Jewish tradition?

By Stephanie Vermillion

This stunning national park is a scuba diver's dream. But it's not for the inexperienced.

By Stephanie Vermillion