Jennifer  Walker-Journey

Jennifer Walker-Journey

Contributing Writer

Jennifer Walker-Journey is a lifelong writer of most anything, including travel destinations, psychedelic and prescription medicines, public health issues and exotic foods. Aside from HowStuffWorks, her work has been featured in USA Today, Psychedelic Spotlight, PlanetSHINE, Better Homes and Gardens, Health, Shape, and Sea Island Life and Omni magazines. When she is not writing, she is running toward her last best time in hopes she'll be foolish enough to attempt another marathon.

Recent Contributions

Think of goosebumps as 'skin orgasms' that are caused by unexpected and pleasant experiences. You know you get them when you're cold, but what is going on in our brains that triggers them?

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

If you think chainsaws were first invented to take down a swath of trees, think again. The real story is much more cringe-worthy and involves cutting bones during childbirth.

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

Adrenochrome has been linked to schizophrenia and the LSD counterculture movement. Now QAnon conspiracy theorists say it's part of a child sex-trafficking cult. So what's the truth behind this chemical compound?

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

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Trovants, found only in a small town in Romania, are stones that actually seem to move and grow. But are they alive?

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

The list of superstar athletes accused of — and admitting to — taking performance-enhancing drugs is almost as impressive as the number of sports that they compete in. And we're not just talking about steroids.

By William Harris, Jennifer Walker-Journey & Austin Henderson

You might be surprised at how little of the world's oceans scientists have investigated.

By Jennifer Walker-Journey & Austin Henderson

The Kola Superdeep Borehole in Russia is the deepest hole in the world. It's deeper than the Mariana Trench and deeper than Mt. Everest is tall. Why did the Russians dig this deep, and why did they stop?

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

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Phrenology, the belief that you could determine personality from the shape of someone's skull, was so popular in the Victorian era that phrenology parlors sprang up all over Europe and America. But the trend was soon debunked.

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

Crinkle crankle walls undulate, mimicking the shape of a snake's slither. But what's the purpose of these wavy walls?

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

There are eight major blood types and some are more common than others. But what's the rarest of them all?

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

Craft beer is big business. And breweries are banking on non-alcoholic beer as their new cash cow. But how do they brew beer without alcohol?

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

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Saliva is not exactly the most appetizing of subjects, but it plays an important role in everything from how food tastes to how it is digested.

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

Every December 23rd in the city of Oaxaca, Mexico, radishes come to life, as carvers compete for cash and bragging rights in this veggie-style Christmas tradition.

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

Remember when seven strangers were picked to live in a house to work together and have their lives taped? We did find out people stop being polite and these 11 reality TV shows helped prove it.

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

Pipes have a long history for Native Americans, and they're still revered and powerful. Just please don't call them peace pipes.

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

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Nearly every cell in your body has the same DNA. It's the hereditary material located your cells' nucleus. But what does it do and why is it so important to all living beings?

By Craig Freudenrich, Ph.D. & Jennifer Walker-Journey

We all know what Viagra does and why men use it — not to mention how much money this particular prescription drug has made over the years. But does it improve sexual health for women, too?

By Karen Kirkpatrick & Jennifer Walker-Journey

You may have heard of kava, or kava kava, and its calming effects, but how much do you know about its history and the risks associated with taking it?

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

Is polio making a comeback in the United States and, if so, are you at risk? We talk to a doctor, who says that vaccination is key.

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

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Believe it or snot, almost every living creature has some kind of mucus — because mucus does so many things. A study found mucus was so beneficial to mammals, it evolved independently in species.

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

Imagine being trapped in a cave or being completely blind. Would you know when to sleep and wake? And how would that throw off your body clock?

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

There's a lot of bad news on the internet and social media. And maybe you can't stop looking at it. Why is that and what can you do about it?

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

The tiny toy testers are the most valuable workers at Fisher-Price Play Lab. And they're behind some of the most successful toys in the business.

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

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Your mom may have told you to put bananas or peaches in a brown paper bag to help them ripen faster. But does this really work? And why would it?

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

Tons of these humongous bug-like creatures live in the darkest depths of the sea, but they are still somewhat of a mystery to us humans.

By Jennifer Walker-Journey