Ian O'Neill

Contributing Writer

Ian writes about space and especially enjoys writing about astrophysics, Mars exploration, black holes and our brave space robots that allow humanity to push beyond the final frontier. He's a British guy living in Los Angeles with a Ph.D. in solar physics and a master's degree in astrophysics. He digs tea and craft beer, and has an obsession for science fiction and computer games. He's forever optimistic that, despite the chaos and uncertainty of our daily lives, we are only at the beginning of the human story from a cosmic perspective. Space exploration is an adventure; it's his job to chronicle our journey. You can also follow his writing and videos on Astroengine.com.

RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS


No one knew exactly what the deal was with ureilites, a rare type of meteorite, until now.

Yep, 'Oumuamua was probably kicked out of its own star system by an overbearing gas giant like Jupiter.

It's called NGC1052-DF2, an ultra-diffuse galaxy located 65 million light-years away, and it might mean that we don't quite know how all galaxies form after all.

Scholz's star buzzed our solar system back when humans and Neanderthals roamed the planet. Turns out that encounter may have shaken up a whole bunch of comets.

Beneath Jupiter's famous swirls and stripes is an environment that's completely unlike anything on Earth.

Plus, a bonus finding on dark matter!

Some neutron stars may have a pretty amazing party trick up their stellar sleeves.

The Kepler Space Telescope seeks out small habitable exoplanets that may share similar qualities to Earth.

TRAPPIST-1 is a mini version of our solar system, and astronomers have started figuring out what life on those exoplanets might be like.

You could be reading this article deep in a dark matter rainforest filled with creatures in a roaring dark matter ecosystem — but have no clue.

Researchers threw the ingredients of the universe into a virtual box and let the known laws of physics bake a cosmic cake. The results are stunning.

Scientist have figured out why two historic avalanches happened on the same unlikely slopes within weeks of one another.

It all started with the suspicious behavior of a single star.

All those intrepid colonists are going to need a plentiful supply of water, and it turns out that accessing one may not be as hard as we thought.

The apparently random flashes in the sky known as FRBs have resisted being pinned down by astronomers. Until now.

When our planet was young, it took a beating from an unrelenting storm of planetesimals falling from the skies. Some of that debris meant more gold for the planet.

The question is, how did it get to be so big so fast?

It's the first interstellar rock we've ever found!