Ian O'Neill

Contributing Writer

Ian writes about space and especially enjoys writing about astrophysics, Mars exploration, black holes and our brave space robots that allow humanity to push beyond the final frontier. He's a British guy living in Los Angeles with a Ph.D. in solar physics and a master's degree in astrophysics. He digs tea and craft beer, and has an obsession for science fiction and computer games. He's forever optimistic that, despite the chaos and uncertainty of our daily lives, we are only at the beginning of the human story from a cosmic perspective. Space exploration is an adventure; it's his job to chronicle our journey. You can also follow his writing and videos on Astroengine.com.

RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS


It's a small world with an astonishingly long orbit around our sun. And it could lead us to the fabled Planet X.

Something very strange is afoot above the frozen landscape of Antarctica.

It dashed through our solar system like a cigar-shaped signal from another star system. But which one? Astronomers are on the case.

This stellar noodle is the strongest material in the cosmos!

Maybe there aren't more dimensions beyond the four that we know and love so well.

We caught up with everyone's favorite boson to see what it's been up to and exactly how it decays.

Jupiter has been notoriously bad about revealing any water deep in its thick atmosphere. That's changing though.

A tiny black hole or a more monstrous neutron star? Astronomers are on the case.

Once upon a time, the sun caught an interstellar orphan and adopted it as its own. It's named 2015 BZ 509.

Europa might be ready to let us in on a secret.

In his last act of genius, Hawking simplified the multiverse and suggests that it's not just boundless bubble universes out there.

Astronomers have just discovered a gas in Uranus' clouds that does nothing to help the planet being taken seriously.

It's been a while since the sun has hung out with its brothers and sisters in the same stellar nursery, but they're definitely out there, and citizen scientists can help find them.

No one knew exactly what the deal was with ureilites, a rare type of meteorite, until now.

Yep, 'Oumuamua was probably kicked out of its own star system by an overbearing gas giant like Jupiter.

It's called NGC1052-DF2, an ultra-diffuse galaxy located 65 million light-years away, and it might mean that we don't quite know how all galaxies form after all.

Scholz's star buzzed our solar system back when humans and Neanderthals roamed the planet. Turns out that encounter may have shaken up a whole bunch of comets.

Beneath Jupiter's famous swirls and stripes is an environment that's completely unlike anything on Earth.

Plus, a bonus finding on dark matter!