Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Contributing Writer

Carrie Whitney is an Atlanta-based writer with a love of all things design, particularly tile. In addition to being willing to cover any topic that sparks her interest, she has spent many years zeroing in on home improvement and currently serves as the newsletter editor for Kitchen & Bath Business magazine. Although she’s never tackled a renovation of her own, she’s pretty handy with a paintbrush.

Carrie earned a B.A. in journalism from Georgia State University, then an M.A. in anthropology and a Ph.D. in history. Along the way, she picked up a B.A. in French literature and remains a devoted Francophile (allez les Bleus!). In addition to writing, she teaches in the department of communication at her alma mater and tries to keep up with the latest trends in social media.

Recent Contributions

Henry Louis Gates Jr. will serve as editor-in-chief of the new Oxford Dictionary of African American English, which is slated to be published in spring 2025.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

At 984 feet tall, Paris' landmark Eiffel Tower is no picnic to maintain, so how is it done and who is responsible for keeping it standing and painted?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

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Coco Chanel is a symbol for fashion and feminism. She's credited with designing the little black dress and the Chanel suit, after all. But hanging in her closet were a few pretty big skeletons, too.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

After the fall of Paris in 1940, French Gen. Charles de Gaulle called for resistance to the Nazis. From military sabotage to civilian clandestine activities, the French answered and resisted mightily.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Plains Indian men kept historical records of their tribes in art. First with petroglyphs and pictographs and then on buffalo hides. When the white man came, they moved their art to ledger books.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Two gas stations might face each other on a street in Anytown, USA. Yet their gas prices might be different. Why is that?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

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Diamonds might be a girl's best friend, but thieves like them too. Find out how they orchestrate multimillion-dollar heists and how jewelers switch the real thing for fakes.

By Julia Layton & Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Come explore the fabulous French capital on a guided tour of the arrondissements with Rick Steves associate Steve Smith.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

The glue, the scraping, the mess, the hours of torture and pain. If the idea of using wallpaper anywhere in your home conjures up images of sheer agony, then temporary, removable paper was made for you.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

The Arc de Triomphe is one of the most iconic and enduring symbols of the city of Paris, France. But why did Napoleon commission it?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

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Student loan refinance and student loan consolidation are completely different beasts. If you're weighed down with student loan debt, you need to know the difference.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Espresso, latte, macchiato. The coffee bean didn't even originate in Italy, so why do so many coffee drinks have Italian names?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Jimmy Carter, who turns 97 this year, isn't necessarily considered one of America's greatest presidents. But the legacy he's built in the 40-plus years after leaving the White House is one that will be hard to top.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Opus 40 is a 6.5-acre (2.6-hectare) earthwork sculpture that was hand-cut and created by artist Harvey Fite over a 37-year period. So how did he do it?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

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Researchers are constantly developing fabrics that can help keep you cool, whether you're working out or trying to get a good night's sleep. But how do they work, and which are the best ones?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Susan B. Anthony's enduring legacy is for her tireless work for women's voting rights in the United States. But there's so much more to her story than just as a suffragette.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

We see buildings pop up and get torn down all the time, but some structures (and the architects who designed them) were built to last. These 16 are some of the most famous.

By Jane McGrath & Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Critical race theory (CRT) is a hot button issue in the United States. School boards and state legislatures in seven states have passed regulations banning it from being taught in the classroom. How did we get here and why is everyone freaking out?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

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This beautiful pink quartz is found in numerous places throughout the world and is thought to be associated with unconditional love.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

The Mohs hardness scale is used by geologists and gemologists as a way to help identify minerals using a hardness test. How does it work?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

This ancient rock, which forms above copper deposits, is beloved for its swirling patterns and vibrant green color. It's dazzled humans for millennia as jewelry and even in décor.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

The housing market in the U.S. is off the charts. Housing inventory is at record lows, and median existing-home sales prices are up 19.1 percent year-over-year. So how's a buyer supposed to win in this seller's market?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

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Tanzanite is so rare, it is sourced from just 8 square miles in Africa. It was first discovered in the late 1960s and it burst onto the jewelry scene thanks to Tiffany & Co.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Museums are fabulous, but street art has a power and immediacy that can grab our attention, delight us and sometimes even startle us out of complacency.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.