Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Contributing Writer

Carrie Whitney is an Atlanta-based writer with a love of all things design, particularly tile. In addition to being willing to cover any topic that sparks her interest, she has spent many years zeroing in on home improvement and currently serves as the newsletter editor for Kitchen & Bath Business magazine. Although she’s never tackled a renovation of her own, she’s pretty handy with a paintbrush.

Carrie earned a B.A. in journalism from Georgia State University, then an M.A. in anthropology and a Ph.D. in history. Along the way, she picked up a B.A. in French literature and remains a devoted Francophile (allez les Bleus!). In addition to writing, she teaches in the department of communication at her alma mater and tries to keep up with the latest trends in social media.

Recent Contributions

The glue, the scraping, the mess, the hours of torture and pain. If the idea of using wallpaper anywhere in your home conjures up images of sheer agony, then temporary, removable paper was made for you.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

The Arc de Triomphe is one of the most iconic and enduring symbols of the city of Paris, France. But why did Napoleon commission it?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Student loan refinance and student loan consolidation are completely different beasts. If you're weighed down with student loan debt, you need to know the difference.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

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Espresso, latte, macchiato. The coffee bean didn't even originate in Italy, so why do so many coffee drinks have Italian names?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Jimmy Carter, who turns 97 this year, isn't necessarily considered one of America's greatest presidents. But the legacy he's built in the 40-plus years after leaving the White House is one that will be hard to top.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Opus 40 is a 6.5-acre (2.6-hectare) earthwork sculpture that was hand-cut and created by artist Harvey Fite over a 37-year period. So how did he do it?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Researchers are constantly developing fabrics that can help keep you cool, whether you're working out or trying to get a good night's sleep. But how do they work, and which are the best ones?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

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Susan B. Anthony's enduring legacy is for her tireless work for women's voting rights in the United States. But there's so much more to her story than just as a suffragette.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

We see buildings pop up and get torn down all the time, but some structures (and the architects who designed them) were built to last. These 16 are some of the most famous.

By Jane McGrath & Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Critical race theory (CRT) is a hot button issue in the United States. School boards and state legislatures in seven states have passed regulations banning it from being taught in the classroom. How did we get here and why is everyone freaking out?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

This beautiful pink quartz is found in numerous places throughout the world and is thought to be associated with unconditional love.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

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The Mohs hardness scale is used by geologists and gemologists as a way to help identify minerals using a hardness test. How does it work?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

This ancient rock, which forms above copper deposits, is beloved for its swirling patterns and vibrant green color. It's dazzled humans for millennia as jewelry and even in décor.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

The housing market in the U.S. is off the charts. Housing inventory is at record lows, and median existing-home sales prices are up 19.1 percent year-over-year. So how's a buyer supposed to win in this seller's market?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Tanzanite is so rare, it is sourced from just 8 square miles in Africa. It was first discovered in the late 1960s and it burst onto the jewelry scene thanks to Tiffany & Co.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

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Museums are fabulous, but street art has a power and immediacy that can grab our attention, delight us and sometimes even startle us out of complacency.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

The overlapping rabbet joint that defines true shiplap is the same kind of joint that made seagoing ships watertight.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

We're all at least passingly familiar with the art movements of the past – impressionism, dada, pop, cubism – but what are today's movements called? Turns out, pinning them down is a bit tricky.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

This postwar era architecture has a heavy, raw look, hence the name. But the designs are sensible and authoritative, and many Brutalist buildings are experiencing a revival.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

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This ancient rock adorns King Tut's coffin and the Sistine Chapel. And at one time it was more precious than gold. What is it about this deep blue rock that has drawn us in for centuries?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Soapstone countertops can be stunning in the right kitchen. But they do come with certain disadvantages. Are they the perfect fit for your dream kitchen?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Can a piece of art be so significant that it changes the way the world sees art itself? Clearly, the answer is yes.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Wainscoting might conjure up images of stodgy oak paneling. But forget that. This design element has stood the test of time because it can seamlessly blend into just about every style and decor.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

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In many countries, the practice of hypergamy has shifted since early times. Part of the reason has to do with the changing roles of women in education and the workplace. So, what does that mean for marriage?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

If you think celebrity kid names like Apple and North West are odd, at least they're easy to remember. These five famous people have names so long, you couldn't recall them if you had to.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.