Carrie Tatro

Carrie Tatro

writer

Carrie Tatro is a freelance writer based in Atlanta, GA, who has been on board with HowStuffWorks since January 2018. She holds a bachelor’s degree in English Lit with a minor in journalism from Georgia State University. A seminary drop-out, her favorite theologians are Flannery O’Connor, David Sedaris and Alan Watts, who nailed it when he said, “Trying to define yourself is like trying to bite your own teeth.”

Carrie worked as a technical writer in Communications at the Georgia Tech Research Institute for several years before moving on to pursue her passion for books. She became the manager and buyer for a large collectible bookstore where she honed her skills and went on to enjoy 15 years as an independent bookseller, specializing in rare and out of print books.

Carrie lives with her husband, George, and a mellow Harrier hound named Rosie, in an old house full of books, folk art and second-hand furniture. She enjoys trail walking and is learning to play the ukulele.


Recent Contributions

The year 2020 saw some of the biggest lightning flashes ever recorded by humankind, called "megaflashes." But how much bigger is a megaflash than a regular bolt of lightning?

By Carrie Tatro

Shinrin-yoku, or forest bathing, is all about slowing down and "bathing" yourself in the beauty of nature, which leads to psycho-emotional healing and stress reduction.

By Carrie Tatro

From meatless Mondays to tofu Tuesdays, reducetarianism is about cutting down on the consumption of animal products instead of completely cutting them out.

By Carrie Tatro

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Hoboes were a widely displaced brotherhood who illegally hopped trains and journeyed across the country, taking odd jobs wherever they could find them. The hobo code helped them survive.

By Carrie Tatro

Originally a method of preserving the fall harvest for winter, hoshigaki (Japanese for dried persimmon) is a centuries-old Japanese delicacy that's easy to make but is remarkably time- and effort-intensive.

By Carrie Tatro

In 1957, a woman named Frances Kipps Spencer invented "Chrismons" to decorate her church's sanctuary and to remind parishioners of the true meaning behind the Christian celebration of Christmas.

By Carrie Tatro

Made of glass, the harrowing Coiling Dragon Cliff Skywalk will test the mettle of anyone brave enough to challenge its heights.

By Carrie Tatro

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The Hongshui River Scenic Park walkway is shaped like a super- colossal, brightly colored butterfly and is twice as long as the island of Manhattan.

By Carrie Tatro

Nearly 400 bird species are in danger of extinction by the end of this century and The Audubon Mural Project intends to depict every one of them.

By Carrie Tatro

From early wrapped objects to monumental outdoor projects, the work of the late artist Christo transcended the traditional bounds of painting, sculpture and architecture.

By Carrie Tatro

When the wind starts whipping and the weather gets wild, it's important to know the difference between a tornado watch and a tornado warning.

By Carrie Tatro

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Ranunculus is a genus containing more than 600 species, all of which are beautiful, but toxic to both humans and animals.

By Carrie Tatro

Tiger lilies have it all – they're edible, have healing properties and act as perfect pollinator magnets. They're also long-lasting, strikingly beautiful and super easy to grow.

By Carrie Tatro

Bee balm is one of those staple plants that gardeners love for its beauty, its many varieties and its value as a magnet for pollinators.

By Carrie Tatro

Lemonade has a long and storied history, from its beginnings in ancient Egypt all the way to current 21st-century pop culture.

By Carrie Tatro

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Yes – it could happen to you, good person. KABOOM! It's fairly rare, but a potentially catastrophic rind failure lurks under the green-striped shell of every seemingly innocent watermelon in the produce aisle.

By Carrie Tatro

Are you really sure you want to know?

By Carrie Tatro

Believed to have operated between 1821 and 1861, the Saltwater Underground Railroad was the coastal escape route followed by fugitive slaves into the British-controlled Bahamas.

By Carrie Tatro

Does February have special historical significance in African-American history?

By Carrie Tatro

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A sudden (or subsequent) temporary upsurge of grief, or STUG, can knock you off your feet and leave you in a puddle, but being aware of it can lessen its power.

By Carrie Tatro

Biochemically like a heron and anatomically similar to a pelican, the shoebill stork has been called "Monsterface" and even "Death Pelican." But wait until you hear the staccato rat-a-tat-tat of its booming machine-gun call.

By Carrie Tatro

Floriography — the association of flowers with special virtues and sentiments — has been a practice from antiquity to the present day.

By Carrie Tatro

Award-winning poet and fiction writer Mary Soon Lee has found a charming way to combine science and poetry in a refreshing new take on the periodic table of elements.

By Carrie Tatro

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Frederick Douglass' pivotal 19th century abolitionist newspaper has been relaunched for a 21st century audience.

By Carrie Tatro