Alia Hoyt

Contributing Writer

Alia is an Atlanta-based freelance writer who has contributed content to HowStuffWorks for going on a decade now. She’s also been published by TLC, Animal Planet, Yahoo! Shine, the ill-fated but completely awesome health and wellness site Upwave and a number of corporate clients. She holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Georgia (Go Dawgs!), and might someday get around to setting up a professional website. Until then, check her out on LinkedIn.

She and her husband are proud parents to three handsome, too-smart-for-their-own-good boys. Alia is a passably not terrible tennis player, lover of all things dance and music, brownie-obsessed, avid reader and off-key car singer. Her two favorite types of people are those who have a healthy sense of humor and those who actually read articles in their entirety before posting comments.

RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS


Spontaneous sex reversal in chickens is pretty rare, but it does happen. Find out how Miss Lucille became Mr. Lucille.

Usually men go bald on top or at the front, while hair remains at the back of the head. What's the reason for this?

Much to the shock of kids everywhere, moms are people too! Take this quiz to test your knowledge of all types of mothers, from record-holders to renowned to notorious.

Despite the overall slump in greeting card sales, millennials are surprisingly drawn to cards and their low-tech charms.

A new study found that black women are exposed to hazardous chemicals in the hair care products they use — often unknowingly.

From thin to thick and back again, we take a pictorial look at eyebrow fashion over the last 100 years.

Today, when we think of a "pox," we think of smallpox. But in Shakespeare's time, the word referred to a dreaded sexually transmitted disease.

It turns out that people who are both healthy and obese are rarer than you might think.

A new study found that menstrual cups are greater breeding grounds for the bacteria that causes toxic shock syndrome than tampons.

A large study from Taiwan showed that people who had asthma and/or hay fever had a higher risk of developing a mental illness than those who didn't.

What in the world did Grandma mean when she used words like "tarnation"?

For those on the list waiting for a kidney donation, it could be years before their name comes up. One doctor is hoping to shorten this wait by retransplanting already donated kidneys.

Online dating apps are aiding social integration because people are interacting with others to whom they previously had no access.

Could they be getting in the way of success? They might. If they're too tight.

If you're one of those people who can't resist putting your fingers to work when you spot a pimple on your face, there's a scientific reason for why it feels so good.

While most generalizations are gross, Americans who have traveled to Europe probably have noticed that certain practices they take for granted are non-existent there. Likewise, Europeans who visit the U.S. are amazed at some habits Americans have.

Doctors' waiting rooms often have signs that a fee will be charged for no-shows or late arrivals. So, should patients ask doctors for reimbursement when they have to wait a long time?

Most of the scientific attention to birdsong has been paid to the male of the species. But many female birds sing too — and scientists are starting to understand how important it is to study them as well.

There's a musical name for dread and it is 'Dies Irae.' How did this 13th century Latin hymn become the go-to tune for conjuring up movie scares?

Many people with Type 1 diabetes are deliberately skipping or manipulating their insulin doses in order to lose weight. But this can have very serious consequences.