Some people are natural-born organizers and some aren't. If you have the knack for organizing clutter, know how to manage your time and plan things out in advance, and are sought out by relatives, friends or acquaintances for advice and guidance, you have what it takes to be a professional organizer [source: POC].

The goal of professional organizers is to make their clients' lives easier by working with them to develop a tailor-made system to get them organized. Professional organizers also teach their clients the skills they need to effectively use that system to successfully manage their environment, stacks of papers and time. The services provided by a professional organizer range from planning storage space to moving an entire office, from reorganizing room space in a home to managing a home office [source: NAPO].

Here's how to become a professional organizer:

  1. Decide whether you want to run your own businesses, freelance, or work as an employee in an organizing company. If you opt for running your own business, you'll need to hone up on -- or acquire -- such business skills as accounting, bookkeeping, and marketing, unless you plan to hire a staff to take on those responsibilities.
  2. Take courses at a reputable professional organizer training school such as the National Association of Professional Organizers (NAPO).
  3. Get some field experience by working for an organizer service, until you feel you're ready to strike out on your own (unless you decide to work as an employee [source: NAPO]).
  4. Get referrals if you plan to start your business or work as a contractor. Ask your current employer or clients for referrals.
  5. Ask local, state and federal agencies about registration, licensing and tax identification requirements before starting your own business.
  6. Make up business cards and brochures, and advertise in your area.