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Clever Manka

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Clever Manka Part II
One day, a very sad man came to the mayor's house.
One day, a very sad man came to the mayor's house.
©2007 Publications International, Ltd.

Below is the second part of "Clever Manka."

One day a man came out of the mayor's house looking very sad. Manka, who had a kind heart, asked the man what was troubling him.

"I have just been telling the mayor my problem," the man said. "I am a farmer. I once owned a mare who had her foal in the market. The foal ran underneath another farmer's wagon. That farmer then claimed that it was his foal. I came to the mayor hoping to get my foal back."

"And did he give you your foal?" Manka asked.

"No, he didn't," the farmer said. "He was thinking of something else while I told him my troubles. And without even listening, he gave the foal to the other farmer."

Manka was sad that this farmer had lost the foal that was rightfully his. And she was angry that her husband, the mayor, had not made a wise choice in this case. So she decided to use her cleverness to help the farmer, even though her husband had told her not to.

Manka gave the sad man tea and told him how to get his foal.
Manka gave the sad man tea and told him how to get his foal.
©2007 Publications International, Ltd.

"Come inside for some tea and I will tell you how to get your foal," said Manka. "Come back this afternoon with your fishing pole. Sit in front of our house, casting the fishing line onto the dry, dusty road. When the mayor asks how you expect to catch fish on a dry, dusty road, answer him in this way: Tell him that it's as easy to catch fish on a dry, dusty road as it is for a wagon to have a foal. But you must not tell him that I told you to do this."

That afternoon, the farmer came back to the mayor's house with his fishing pole. He cast the line onto the dry, dusty road. When the mayor saw this, he asked, "Why are you fishing on the dry, dusty road? Are you crazy?"

The farmer brought his fishing pole to the mayor's house.
The farmer brought his fishing pole to the mayor's house.
©2007 Publications International, Ltd.

The farmer replied, "It is as easy to fish on a dry, dusty road as it is for a wagon to have a foal."

The mayor realized that he had been wrong and said, "Of course that foal belongs to you. But tell me, who was clever enough to tell you to do this?"

The farmer forgot what Manka had asked him and blurted out her name. This made the mayor very angry.

The mayor went inside and said to Manka, "Do you remember what I told you about giving advice to those who come to me? You must go back to live with your father, but you may take the one thing that you like the best from my house." With that, the mayor went to bed.

When the mayor awoke, he wasn't in his own house.
When the mayor awoke, he wasn't in his own house.
©2007 Publications International, Ltd.

The next morning, the mayor awoke to find himself somewhere other than his own bed and own house. He looked around and rubbed his eyes. He was in the poor shepherd's small cottage!

Seeing Manka standing before him, the mayor asked, "What have you done, taking me from my own house?"

Manka smiled and replied, "You told me that I could take the one thing that I liked the best from your house. And because I love you with all my heart, I took you. That is why you are here in my father's cottage."

The mayor thought about this for a moment and then began to laugh and laugh. "Manka," he said, "you are far more clever than I am. Let's go home."

From that day forth, the mayor always accepted clever Manka's advice whenever he had a case that was particularly difficult or puzzling.

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